Article

Estrogen and Cancer.

Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education), Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100191, China and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Medical Epigenetics, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin 300070, China.
Annual Review of Physiology (Impact Factor: 19.55). 10/2012; DOI: 10.1146/annurev-physiol-030212-183708
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Estrogen exhibits a broad spectrum of physiological functions ranging from regulation of the menstrual cycle and reproduction to modulation of bone density, brain function, and cholesterol mobilization. Despite the beneficial actions of endogenous estrogen, sustained exposure to exogenous estrogen is a well-established risk factor for various cancers. We summarize our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms of estrogen signaling in normal and cancer cells and discuss the major challenges to the existing antiestrogen therapy. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Physiology Volume 75 is February 10, 2013. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/catalog/pubdates.aspx for revised estimates.

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