Article

Drosophila embryos close epithelial wounds using a combination of cellular protrusions and an actomyosin purse string

Journal of Cell Science (Impact Factor: 5.33). 10/2012; 125(24). DOI: 10.1242/jcs.109066
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The repair of injured tissue must occur rapidly to prevent microbial invasion and maintain tissue integrity. Epithelial tissues in particular, which serve as a barrier against the external environment, must repair efficiently in order to restore their primary function. Here we analyze the effect of different parameters on the epithelial wound repair process in the late stage Drosophila embryo using in vivo wound assays, expression of cytoskeleton and membrane markers, and mutant analysis. We define four distinct phases in the repair process-expansion, coalescence, contraction, and closure-and describe the molecular dynamics of each phase. Specifically, we find that myosin, E-cadherin, Echinoid, the plasma membrane, microtubules, and the Cdc42 small GTPase respond dynamically during wound repair, and demonstrate that perturbations of each of these components result in specific impairments to the wound healing process. Our results show that embryonic epithelial wound repair is mediated by two simultaneously acting mechanisms: crawling driven by cellular protrusions and actomyosin ring contraction along the leading edge of the wound.

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