Article

Preliminary Biological and Phytochemical Investigation of two Nigerian Medicinal Plants

09/2008; 24(3):147-153. DOI: 10.3109/13880208609060892

ABSTRACT Abstract A. total often extracts of two plants Pleioceras barteri Baill and Marsdenia latifolia Schum, normally used in folkloric medicine in Nigeria have been screened for their phytoconstituents and implicated biological activity. Nine (90%) of the extracts gave positive test for alkaloids, four (40%) for flavonoids, five (50%) for saponins, two (20%) for tannins, and four (40%) for sterols. Their antibacterial, hippocratic activity is discussed while the abortifacient activity of Pleioceras barteri is highlighted.

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