Article

Complications of the catheterizable channel following continent urinary diversion: Their nature and timing

Department of Pediatric Urological Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
The Journal of urology (Impact Factor: 3.75). 09/2008; 180(4 Suppl):1856-60. DOI: 10.1016/j.juro.2008.03.093
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT We reviewed the incidence, nature and timing of complications related to the catheterizable channel following continent urinary diversion.
We retrospectively reviewed the records of 67 patients who underwent continent urinary diversion at British Columbia Children's Hospital from 2000 to 2006. Catheterizable channels included 54 Mitrofanoff appendicovesicostomies and 13 ileovesicostomies. Medical records were reviewed for predetermined complications and their timing, that is early -12 months or less, or late - more than 12 months.
At a median followup of 28 months (range 3 to 62) a total of 17 complications were identified in 14 patients (21%). Superficial cutaneous stenosis developed in 4 of 67 cases (6%) as an early and as a late complication. These cases were initially treated with operative dilation and surgical revision as necessary. Channel stricture, which developed in 4 of 67 patients (6%) as an early and as a late complication, was treated with operative revision in 2 and endoscopic resection in 2. Three patients (5%) had stomal prolapse, which was generally a late occurrence and required operative revision in all. Channel leakage developed in 6 of 67 patients, presenting as an early complication in 50%. Endoscopic injection of bulking agents was attempted in 4 of these patients and it was successful in 2. Overall 82% of complications were successfully managed by endoscopic or superficial procedures.
Complications of the catheterizable channel are a frequent and challenging problem. They appear to occur throughout the life of the channel with most developing within the first 2 years. Further followup is required to assess the performance and durability of continent catheterizable channels in children as patients progress to adulthood.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
131 Views