Depletion of 26S Proteasomes in Mouse Brain Neurons Causes Neurodegeneration and Lewy-Like Inclusions Resembling Human Pale Bodies

School of Biomedical Sciences and School of Molecular Medical Sciences, University of Nottingham Medical School, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham NG7 2UH, United Kingdom.
The Journal of Neuroscience : The Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience (Impact Factor: 6.34). 09/2008; 28(33):8189-98. DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2218-08.2008
Source: PubMed


Ubiquitin-positive intraneuronal inclusions are a consistent feature of the major human neurodegenerative diseases, suggesting that dysfunction of the ubiquitin proteasome system is central to disease etiology. Research using inhibitors of the 20S proteasome to model Parkinson's disease is controversial. We report for the first time that specifically 26S proteasomal dysfunction is sufficient to trigger neurodegenerative disease. Here, we describe novel conditional genetic mouse models using the Cre/loxP system to spatially restrict inactivation of Psmc1 (Rpt2/S4) to neurons of either the substantia nigra or forebrain (e.g., cortex, hippocampus, and striatum). PSMC1 is an essential subunit of the 26S proteasome and Psmc1 conditional knock-out mice display 26S proteasome depletion in targeted neurons, in which the 20S proteasome is not affected. Impairment of specifically ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation caused intraneuronal Lewy-like inclusions and extensive neurodegeneration in the nigrostriatal pathway and forebrain regions. Ubiquitin and alpha-synuclein neuropathology was evident, similar to human Lewy bodies, but interestingly, inclusion bodies contained mitochondria. We support this observation by demonstrating mitochondria in an early form of Lewy body (pale body) from Parkinson's disease patients. The results directly confirm that 26S dysfunction in neurons is involved in the pathology of neurodegenerative disease. The model demonstrates that 26S proteasomes are necessary for normal neuronal homeostasis and that 20S proteasome activity is insufficient for neuronal survival. Finally, we are providing the first reproducible genetic platform for identifying new therapeutic targets to slow or prevent neurodegeneration.

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    • "The first indications were found already more than 25 years ago, when components of the UPS were found in inclusions of several neurological diseases including PD, Pick's disease but also in Rosenthal fibers in astrocytomas (Lowe et al., 1988). Depletion of 26S proteasome in mice neurons led to significant neurodegeneration and inclusion body formation (Bedford et al., 2008). Although the depletion was restricted to neurons, changes in glia were observed as astrocytes showed an increase in GFAP and vimentin protein expression, indicative of reactive gliosis (Elkharaz et al., 2013). "
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    ABSTRACT: The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is crucial for intracellular protein homeostasis and for degradation of aberrant and damaged proteins. The accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's disease, leading to the hypothesis that proteasomal impairment is contributing to these diseases. So far, most research related to the UPS in neurodegenerative diseases has been focused on neurons, while glial cells have been largely disregarded in this respect. However, glial cells are essential for proper neuronal function and adopt a reactive phenotype in neurodegenerative diseases, thereby contributing to an inflammatory response. This process is called reactive gliosis, which in turn affects UPS function in glial cells. In many neurodegenerative diseases, mostly neurons show accumulation and aggregation of ubiquitinated proteins, suggesting that glial cells may be better equipped to maintain proper protein homeostasis. During an inflammatory reaction, the immunoproteasome is induced in glia, which may contribute to a more efficient degradation of disease-related proteins. Here we review the role of the UPS in glial cells in various neurodegenerative diseases, and we discuss how studying glial cell function might provide essential information in unraveling mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases.
    Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience 08/2014; 7:73. DOI:10.3389/fnmol.2014.00073 · 4.08 Impact Factor
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    • "Both systems cooperatively play an important role in intracellular protein degradation in the brain. Further studies using a brain-specific deletion of each system have shown that mice exhibit neurological deficits with age and that misfolded proteins are accumulated in neurons [1, 2]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Background Extensive research on p62 has established its role in oxidative stress, protein degradation and in several diseases such as Paget’s disease of the bone, frontotemporal lobar degeneration and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Importantly, previous studies showed that p62 binds directly to Keap1, which is a ubiquitin E3 ligase responsible for degrading Nrf2. Indeed, colocalisation of p62 and Keap1 occurs in tumorigenesis and neurodegeneration. A serine (S) residue in the Keap1-interacting region of p62 is phosphorylated in hepatocellular carcinoma, and this phosphorylation contributes to tumour growth through the higher affinity of p62 to Keap1. However, it remains largely unknown whether p62 is phosphorylated in the Keap1-interacting region under neurodegenerative conditions. Results To answer this question, we generated an antibody against phosphorylated S349 (P-S349) of p62 and showed that S349 is phosphorylated following disruption of protein degradation. In particular, the ratio of P-S349 to total p62 levels was significantly increased in the brains with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) compared with controls. We also compared the reactivity of the P-S349 antibody with P-S403 of p62 and showed that these two phosphorylated sites on p62 cause different responses with proteasome inhibition and show distinct localisation patterns in AD brains. In addition to disruption of protein degradation systems, activation of oxidative stress can induce P-S349. Conclusion These results support the hypothesis that disruption of protein degradation systems and sustained activation of the Keap1-Nrf2 system occur in the brains with AD. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/2051-5960-2-50) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.
    05/2014; 2(1):50. DOI:10.1186/2051-5960-2-50
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    • "Moreover, mutations in Parkin known to cause an early onset, autosomal recessive form of PD is important for the targeting of proteins to the proteasome and expression of parkin proteins has been shown to be reduced in PD. Furthermore, inhibition of the proteasome has been shown to cause neurodegeneration and Lewy body like inclusions in a number of model systems while genetic ablation of subunits of the proteasome leads to extensive motor symptoms (Bedford et al. 2008). "
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    ABSTRACT: As the second most common age related neurodegenerative disease after Alzheimer's disease, the health, social and economic impact resulting from Parkinson's disease will continue to increase alongside the longevity of the population. Ageing remains the biggest risk factor for developing idiopathic Parkinson's disease. Although research into the mechanisms leading to cell death in Parkinson's disease has shed light on many aspects of the pathogenesis of this disorder, we still cannot answer the fundamental question, what specific age related factors predispose some individuals to develop this common neurodegenerative disease. In this review we focus specifically on the neuronal population associated with the motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease, the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra, and try to understand how ageing puts these neurons at risk to the extent that a slight change in protein metabolism or mitochondrial function can push the cells over the edge leading to catastrophic cell death and many of the symptoms seen in Parkinson's disease. We review the evidence that ageing is important for the development of Parkinson's disease and how age related decline leads to the loss of neurons within this disease, before describing exactly how advancing age may lead to substantia nigra neuronal loss and Parkinson's disease in some individuals.
    Ageing research reviews 02/2014; 14(100). DOI:10.1016/j.arr.2014.01.004 · 4.94 Impact Factor
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