Article

A fluorescent alternative to the strigolactone GR24.

Plant Production, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent University, Coupure links 653, Ghent 9000, Belgium.
Molecular Plant (Impact Factor: 6.13). 09/2012; DOI: 10.1093/mp/sss110
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Strigolactones have recently been implicated in both above and below ground developmental pathways in higher plants. To facilitate the molecular and chemical properties of strigolactones in vitro and in vivo, we have developed a fluorescent strigolactone molecule, CISA-1, synthesised via a novel method which was robust, high-yielding and used simple starting materials. We demonstrate that CISA-1 has a broad range of known strigolactone activities and further report on an adventitious rooting assay in Arabidopsis which is a highly sensitive and rapid method for testing biological activity of strigolactone analogues. In this rooting assay and the widely used Orobanche germination assay CISA-1 showed stronger biological activity than the commonly tested GR24. CISA-1 and GR24 were equally effective at inhibiting branching in Arabidopsis inflorescence stems. In both the branching and adventitious rooting assay we also demonstrated that CISA-1 activity is dependent on the max strigolactone signalling pathway. In water methanol solutions, CISA-1 was about 3 fold more stable than GR24, which may contribute to the increased activity observed in the various biological tests.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
190 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The plant hormone auxin is a key morphogenetic signal that controls many aspects of plant growth and development. Cellular auxin levels are coordinately regulated by multiple processes, including auxin biosynthesis and the polar transport and metabolic pathways. The auxin concentration gradient determines plant organ positioning and growth responses to environmental cues. Auxin transport systems play crucial roles in the spatiotemporal regulation of the auxin gradient. This auxin gradient has been analyzed using SCF-type E3 ubiquitin-ligase complex-based auxin biosensors in synthetic auxin-responsive reporter lines. However, the contributions of auxin biosynthesis and metabolism to the auxin gradient have been largely elusive. Additionally, the available information on subcellular auxin localization is still limited. Here we designed fluorescently labeled auxin analogs that remain active for auxin transport but are inactive for auxin signaling and metabolism. Fluorescent auxin analogs enable the selective visualization of the distribution of auxin by the auxin transport system. Together with auxin biosynthesis inhibitors and an auxin biosensor, these analogs indicated a substantial contribution of local auxin biosynthesis to the formation of auxin maxima at the root apex. Moreover, fluorescent auxin analogs mainly localized to the endoplasmic reticulum in cultured cells and roots, implying the presence of a subcellular auxin gradient in the cells. Our work not only provides a useful tool for the plant chemical biology field but also demonstrates a new strategy for imaging the distribution of small-molecule hormones.
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 07/2014;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Plants have acquired the capacity to grow continuously and adjust their morphology in response to endogenous and external signals, leading to a high architectural plasticity. The dynamic and differential distribution of phytohormones is an essential factor in these developmental changes. Phytohormone perception is a fast but complex process modulating specific developmental reprogramming. In recent years, chemical genomics or the use of small molecules to modulate target protein function has emerged as a powerful strategy to study complex biological processes in plants such as hormone signaling. Small molecules can be applied in a conditional, dose-dependent and reversible manner, with the advantage of circumventing the limitations of lethality and functional redundancy inherent to traditional mutant screens. High-throughput screening of diverse chemical libraries has led to the identification of bioactive molecules able to induce plant hormone-related phenotypes. Characterization of the cognate targets and pathways of those molecules has allowed the identification of novel regulatory components, providing new insights into the molecular mechanisms of plant hormone signaling. An extensive structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis of the natural phytohormones, their designed synthetic analogs and newly identified bioactive molecules has led to the determination of the structural requirements essential for their bioactivity. In this review, we will summarize the so far identified small molecules and their structural variants targeting specific phytohormone signaling pathways. We will highlight how the SAR analyses have enabled better interrogation of the molecular mechanisms of phytohormone responses. Finally, we will discuss how labeled/tagged hormone analogs can be exploited, as compelling tools to better understand hormone signaling and transport mechanisms.
    Frontiers in Plant Science 01/2014; 5:373. · 3.60 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Wound-induced adventitious root (AR) formation is a requirement for plant survival upon root damage inflicted by pathogen attack, but also during the regeneration of plant stem cuttings for clonal propagation of elite plant varieties. Yet, adventitious rooting also takes place without wounding. This happens for example in etiolated Arabidopsis thaliana hypocotyls, in which AR initiate upon de-etiolation or in tomato seedlings, in which AR initiate upon flooding or high water availability. In the hypocotyl AR originate from a cell layer reminiscent to the pericycle in the primary root (PR) and the initiated AR share histological and developmental characteristics with lateral roots (LRs). In contrast to the PR however, the hypocotyl is a determinate structure with an established final number of cells. This points to differences between the induction of hypocotyl AR and LR on the PR, as the latter grows indeterminately. The induction of AR on the hypocotyl takes place in environmental conditions that differ from those that control LR formation. Hence, AR formation depends on differentially regulated gene products. Similarly to AR induction in stem cuttings, the capacity to induce hypocotyl AR is genotype-dependent and the plant growth regulator auxin is a key regulator controlling the rooting response. The hormones cytokinins, ethylene, jasmonic acid, and strigolactones in general reduce the root-inducing capacity. The involvement of this many regulators indicates that a tight control and fine-tuning of the initiation and emergence of AR exists. Recently, several genetic factors, specific to hypocotyl adventitious rooting in A. thaliana, have been uncovered. These factors reveal a dedicated signaling network that drives AR formation in the Arabidopsis hypocotyl. Here we provide an overview of the environmental and genetic factors controlling hypocotyl-born AR and we summarize how AR formation and the regulating factors of this organogenesis are distinct from LR induction.
    Frontiers in Plant Science 01/2014; 5:495. · 3.60 Impact Factor

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
123 Downloads
Available from
May 31, 2014