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    • "Recently, 28 studies have reported that more than 4,300 egg-allergic individuals who received influenza vaccines presented with no serious reactions (including respiratory distress or hypotension) and that only a low rate percentage of patients presented with minor reactions (hives and mild wheezing). Such results did not significantly differ from the rate in non-egg-allergic controls [17,37,38]. The majority of these studies specifically included patients with histories of severe anaphylaxis (n=656) as a result of egg ingestion. "
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    ABSTRACT: Currently, the increasing numbers of vaccine administrations are associated with increased reports of adverse vaccine reactions. Whilst the general adverse reactions including allergic reactions caused by the vaccine itself or the vaccine components, are rare, they can in some circumstances be serious and even fatal. In accordance with many IgE-mediated reactions and immediate-type allergic reactions, the primary allergens are proteins. The proteins most often implicated in vaccine allergies are egg and gelatin, with perhaps rare reactions to yeast or latex. Numerous studies have demonstrated that the injectable influenza vaccine can be safely administered, although with appropriate precautions, to patients with severe egg allergy, as the current influenza vaccines contain small trace amounts of egg protein. If an allergy is suspected, an accurate examination followed by algorithms is vital for correct diagnosis, treatment and decision regarding re-vaccination in patients with immediate-type reactions to vaccines. Facilities and health care professionals should be available to treat immediate hypersensitivity reactions (anaphylaxis) in all settings where vaccines are administered.
    01/2014; 3(1):50-57. DOI:10.7774/cevr.2014.3.1.50
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    ABSTRACT: This review highlights some of the research advances in anaphylaxis; hypersensitivity reactions to foods, drugs, and insects; and allergic skin diseases that were reported in the Journal in 2011. Food allergy appears to be increasing in prevalence and carries a strong economic burden. Risk factors can include dietary ones, such as deficiency of vitamin D and timing of complementary foods, and genetic factors, such as filaggrin loss-of-function mutations. Novel mechanisms underlying food allergy include the role of invariant natural killer T cells and influences of dietary components, such as isoflavones. Among numerous preclinical and clinical treatment studies, promising observations include the efficacy of sublingual and oral immunotherapy, a Chinese herbal remedy showing promising in vitro results, the potential immunotherapeutic effects of having children ingest foods with baked-in milk if they tolerate it, and the use of anti-IgE with or without concomitant immunotherapy. Studies of allergic skin diseases, anaphylaxis, and hypersensitivity to drugs and insect venom are elucidating cellular mechanisms, improved diagnostics, and potential targets for future treatment. The role of skin barrier abnormalities, as well as the modulatory effects of the innate and adaptive immune responses, are major areas of investigation.
    The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology 12/2012; 129(1):76-85. DOI:10.1016/j.jaci.2011.11.016 · 11.48 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Although influenza vaccine contains some residual egg protein (ovalbumin), recent studies have been reported that the influenza vaccine is even safe for patients with egg allergy. The object of this study was to assess the safety of influenza vaccination and estimate the risk factors of allergic reactions to influenza vaccination in children with egg allergy.
    01/2013; 1(4):333. DOI:10.4168/aard.2013.1.4.333
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