Article

Uncovering the neurobehavioural comorbidities of epilepsy over the lifespan.

Department of Neurology, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA.
The Lancet (Impact Factor: 39.21). 09/2012; 380(9848):1180-92. DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61455-X
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder that is complicated by psychiatric, cognitive, and social comorbidities that have become a major target of concern and investigation in view of their adverse effect on the course and quality of life. In this report we define the specific psychiatric, cognitive, and social comorbidities of paediatric and adult epilepsy, their epidemiology, and real life effects; examine the relation between epilepsy syndromes and the risk of neurobehavioural comorbidities; address the lifespan effect of epilepsy on brain neurodevelopment and brain ageing and the risk of neurobehavioural comorbidities; consider the overarching effect of broader brain disorders on both epilepsy and neurobehavioural comorbidities; examine directions of causality and the contribution of selected epilepsy-related characteristics; and outline clinic-friendly screening approaches for these problems and recommended pharmacological, behavioural, and educational interventions.

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