Article

Generation of Breast Cancer Stem Cells through Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition

University of Helsinki, Finland
PLoS ONE (Impact Factor: 3.53). 02/2008; 3(8):e2888. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0002888
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Recently, two novel concepts have emerged in cancer biology: the role of so-called "cancer stem cells" in tumor initiation, and the involvement of an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the metastatic dissemination of epithelial cancer cells. Using a mammary tumor progression model, we show that cells possessing both stem and tumorigenic characteristics of "cancer stem cells" can be derived from human mammary epithelial cells following the activation of the Ras-MAPK pathway. The acquisition of these stem and tumorigenic characters is driven by EMT induction.

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