Article

Transposon Tn5.

Josephine Bay Paul Center for Comparative Molecular Biology and Evolution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543, USA.
Annual Review of Genetics (Impact Factor: 17.44). 09/2008; 42:269-86. DOI:10.1146/annurev.genet.42.110807.091656
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Tn5 was one of the first transposons to be identified ( 10 ). As a result of Tn5's early discovery and its simple macromolecular requirements for transposition, the Tn5 system has been a very productive tool for studying the molecular mechanism of DNA transposition. These studies are of broad value because they offer insights into DNA transposition in general, because DNA transposition is a useful model with which to understand other types of protein-DNA interactions such as retroviral DNA integration and the DNA cleavage events involved in immunoglobulin gene formation, and because Tn5-derived tools are useful adjuncts in genetic experimentation.

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W S Reznikoff