Article

Nonerythropoietic, tissue-protective peptides derived from the tertiary structure of erythropoietin.

Warren Pharmaceuticals, Ossining, NY 10562, USA.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (Impact Factor: 9.81). 09/2008; 105(31):10925-30. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0805594105
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Erythropoietin (EPO), a member of the type 1 cytokine superfamily, plays a critical hormonal role regulating erythrocyte production as well as a paracrine/autocrine role in which locally produced EPO protects a wide variety of tissues from diverse injuries. Significantly, these functions are mediated by distinct receptors: hematopoiesis via the EPO receptor homodimer and tissue protection via a heterocomplex composed of the EPO receptor and CD131, the beta common receptor. In the present work, we have delimited tissue-protective domains within EPO to short peptide sequences. We demonstrate that helix B (amino acid residues 58-82) of EPO, which faces the aqueous medium when EPO is bound to the receptor homodimer, is both neuroprotective in vitro and tissue protective in vivo in a variety of models, including ischemic stroke, diabetes-induced retinal edema, and peripheral nerve trauma. Remarkably, an 11-aa peptide composed of adjacent amino acids forming the aqueous face of helix B is also tissue protective, as confirmed by its therapeutic benefit in models of ischemic stroke and renal ischemia-reperfusion. Further, this peptide simulating the aqueous surface of helix B also exhibits EPO's trophic effects by accelerating wound healing and augmenting cognitive function in rodents. As anticipated, neither helix B nor the 11-aa peptide is erythropoietic in vitro or in vivo. Thus, the tissue-protective activities of EPO are mimicked by small, nonerythropoietic peptides that simulate a portion of EPO's three-dimensional structure.

1 Follower
 · 
161 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Protein modifications of recombinant pharmaceuticals have been observed both in vitro and in vivo. These modifications may result in lower efficacy, as well as bioavailability changes and antigenicity among the protein pharmaceuticals. Therefore, the contents of modification should be monitored for the quality and efficacy of protein pharmaceuticals. The interface of EPO and its receptor was visualized, and potential amino acids interacting on the interface were also listed. Two different types of modifications on the interface were identified in the preparation of rHu-EPO BRP. A UPLC/Q-TOF MS method was used to evaluate the modification at those variants. The modification of the oxidized variant was localized on the Met54 and the deamidated variants were localized on the Asn47 and Asn147. The extent of oxidation at Met54 was 3.0% and those of deamidation at Asn47 and Asn147 were 2.9% and 4.8%, respectively.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Helix B surface peptide (HBSP), derived from erythropoietin, displays powerful tissue protection during kidney ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury without erythropoietic side effects. We employed cyclization strategy for the first time, and synthesized thioether-cyclized helix B peptide (CHBP) to improve metabolic stability and renoprotective effect. LC–MS/MS analysis was adopted to examine the stability of CHBP in vitro and in vivo. The renoprotective effect of CHBP in terms of renal function, apoptosis, inflammation, extracellular matrix deposition, and histological injury were also detected in vivo and in vitro. Antibody array and western blot were performed to analyze the signal pathway of involvement by CHBP in the IR model and renal tubular epithelial cells. In this study, thioether-cyclized peptide was significantly stable in vivo and in vitro. One dose of 8 nmol/kg CHBP administered intraperitoneally at the onset of reperfusion improved renal protection compared with three doses of 8 nmol/kg linear HBSP in a 48 h murine IR model. In a one-week model, the one dose CHBP-treated group exhibited remarkably improved renal function over the IR group, and attenuated kidney injury, including reduced inflammation and apoptosis. Interestingly, we found that the phosphorylation of autophagy protein mTORC1 was dramatically reduced upon CHBP treatment. We also demonstrated that CHBP induced autophagy via inhibition of mTORC1 and activation of mTORC2, leading to renoprotective effects on IR. Our results indicate that the novel metabolically stable CHBP is a promising therapeutic medicine for kidney IR injury treatment.
    Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular Basis of Disease 11/2014; 1842(11). DOI:10.1016/j.bbadis.2014.09.001 · 5.09 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Until 1990, erythropoietin (EPO) was considered to have a single biological purpose and action, the stimulation of red blood cell growth and differentiation. Slowly, scientific and medical opinion evolved, beginning with the discovery of an effect on endothelial cell growth in vitro and the identification of EPO receptors (EPORs) on neuronal cells. We now know that EPO is a pleiotropic growth factor that exhibits an anti-apoptotic action on numerous cells and tissues, including malignant ones. In this article, we present a short discussion of EPO, receptors involved in EPO signal transduction, and their action on non-hematopoietic cells. This is followed by a more detailed presentation of both pre-clinical and clinical data that demonstrate EPO's action on cancer cells, as well as tumor angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Clinical trials with reported adverse effects of chronic erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) treatment as well as clinical studies exploring the prognostic significance of EPO and EPOR expression in cancer patients are reviewed. Finally, we address the use of EPO and other ESAs in cancer patients.
    Frontiers in Immunology 11/2014; 5:563. DOI:10.3389/fimmu.2014.00563

Full-text (2 Sources)

Download
55 Downloads
Available from
May 27, 2014