Article

First-trimester maternal alcohol consumption and the risk of infant oral clefts in Norway: A population-based case-control study

Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences/National Institutes of Health, Durham, NC 27709, USA.
American journal of epidemiology (Impact Factor: 4.98). 10/2008; 168(6):638-46. DOI: 10.1093/aje/kwn186
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Although alcohol is a recognized teratogen, evidence is limited on alcohol intake and oral cleft risk. The authors examined the association between maternal alcohol consumption and oral clefts in a national, population-based case-control study of infants born in 1996-2001 in Norway. Participants were 377 infants with cleft lip with or without cleft palate, 196 with cleft palate only, and 763 controls. Mothers reported first-trimester alcohol consumption in self-administered questionnaires completed within a few months after delivery. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals, adjusting for confounders. Compared with nondrinkers, women who reported binge-level drinking (>or=5 drinks per sitting) were more likely to have an infant with cleft lip with or without cleft palate (odds ratio = 2.2, 95% confidence interval: 1.1, 4.2) and cleft palate only (odds ratio = 2.6, 95% confidence interval: 1.2, 5.6). Odds ratios were higher among women who binged on three or more occasions: odds ratio = 3.2 for cleft lip with or without cleft palate (95% confidence interval: 1.0, 10.2) and odds ratio = 3.0 for cleft palate only (95% confidence interval: 0.7, 13.0). Maternal binge-level drinking may increase the risk of infant clefts.

Full-text

Available from: Lisa A. DeRoo, Jun 08, 2015
0 Followers
 · 
78 Views