Article

Exposure to hexachlorobenzene during pregnancy increases the risk of overweight in children aged 6 years

Center for Research in Environmental Epidemiology, Institut Municipal Investigació Mèdica, Barcelona, Spain.
Acta Paediatrica (Impact Factor: 1.84). 11/2008; 97(10):1465-9. DOI: 10.1111/j.1651-2227.2008.00937.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT To determine whether prenatal exposure to hexachlorobenzene (HCB) has potential adverse effects on child's weight and body mass index (BMI) in a general population with no local pollution sources.
Starting from mid 1997, all mothers presenting for antenatal exposure in Menorca were recruited. Subsequently, 482 children were enrolled. HCB was measured in cord blood. Weight and height were measured at birth and at age 6.5 years.
Children with HCB levels higher than 1.03 ng/mL in cord blood were 1.14 kg (0.38) heavier and had a higher BMI (beta= 0.80 (0.34)) than children with HCB levels lower than 0.46 ng/mL. No statistically significant associations were found in height. Children in the higher exposure group of HCB had an increased risk of 2.5 and 3.0 of being overweight and obese. Children from normal weight mothers also presented an increased risk of having higher BMI with increasing concentrations of HCB in cord serum.
Prenatal exposure to HCB is associated with an increase in BMI and weight at age 6.5 years. Further studies with larger samples and longer follow-up are needed to confirm these results.

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Available from: Agnes J Smink, Aug 29, 2015
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    • "It has been suggested that EDCs can affect adipocyte differentiation and weight homeostasis (Baillie-Hamilton, 2002; Grun and Blumberg, 2007; Heindel, 2003), possibly through activation of nuclear receptors such as the PPARs (Grun and Blumberg, 2007), and various chemicals have been linked to obesity and metabolic disorders including tributyltin (TBT), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), bisphenol A (BPA) (Langer et al., 2007; Miyawaki et al., 2007; Smink et al., 2008; Vasiliu et al., 2006; vom Saal et al., 2012). Especially exposure of the fetus to EDCs is considered to increase the risk of obesity in adult life as developmental programming of metabolic set points may be disturbed (Frontera et al., 2008; Levin, 2006; vom Saal et al., 2012). "
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    • "It has been suggested that EDCs can affect adipocyte differentiation and weight homeostasis (Baillie-Hamilton, 2002; Grun and Blumberg, 2007; Heindel, 2003), possibly through activation of nuclear receptors such as the PPARs (Grun and Blumberg, 2007), and various chemicals have been linked to obesity and metabolic disorders including tributyltin (TBT), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), bisphenol A (BPA) (Langer et al., 2007; Miyawaki et al., 2007; Smink et al., 2008; Vasiliu et al., 2006; vom Saal et al., 2012). Especially exposure of the fetus to EDCs is considered to increase the risk of obesity in adult life as developmental programming of metabolic set points may be disturbed (Frontera et al., 2008; Levin, 2006; vom Saal et al., 2012). "
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    • "Animal experiments and epidemiological studies have listed other suspected obesogens such as diethylstilbestrol (DES), bisphenol A (BPA), phytoestrogens, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), phthalates and perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs) [15-17]. For example, a number of studies have found an association between prenatal organochlorine (OC) compound exposure and increased BMI in infancy [18], childhood [19,20] and adulthood [21]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Background Humans are exposed to tributyltin (TBT), previously used as an antifouling paint in ships, mainly through fish consumption. As TBT is a known obesogen, we studied the association of placenta TBT and other organotin compounds (OTCs) with ponderal index (PI) and growth during the first 18 months of life in boys. Methods In a prospective Finnish study, 110 placenta samples were collected from mothers of boys born in 1997–1999 with (n = 55) and without (n = 55) cryptorchidism. To account for the original study design, linear regression, weighted for sampling fractions of boys with (121/55) and without (5677/55) cryptorchidism from the total cohort, was used to study the association between placenta OTCs and children’s weight, length, growth rates and PI up to 18 months of age. Results Placenta TBT concentrations were above the limit of quantification (LOQ) in 99% of the samples. However, monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT) and triphenyltin (TPhT) concentrations were below LOQ in 90%, 35% and 57% of samples, respectively. Placenta TBT was positively associated (p = 0.024) with weight gain during the first three months of life, but no other significant associations were observed for weight or length gain. Also, no significant associations between placenta OTC concentrations and child length, weight or PI at any time point were found. Conclusions We observed a trend towards higher weight gain from birth to 3 months of age with increasing placenta TBT concentration. These results should be interpreted with caution because obesogenic effects in animal experiments were seen after in-utero TBT exposures to doses that were orders of magnitude higher. Also the number of study subjects included in this study was limited.
    Environmental Health 06/2014; 13(45). DOI:10.1186/1476-069X-13-45 · 2.71 Impact Factor
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