Article

SIOP PODC: Clinical Guidelines for the Management of Children With Wilms Tumour in a Low Income Setting

International Outreach Program, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee. .
Pediatric Blood & Cancer (Impact Factor: 2.56). 01/2013; 60(1). DOI: 10.1002/pbc.24321
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Wilms tumour is a relatively common and curable paediatric tumour. Known challenges to cure in low income countries are late presentation with advanced disease, malnutrition, failure to complete treatment and limited facilities. In this article, management recommendations are given for a low income setting where only the minimal requirements for treatment with curative intent are available (setting 1). These include general management, supportive care, social support and registration of patients. Recommendations specific for Wilms tumour care include diagnostic procedures with emphasis on the role of ultrasonography, preoperative chemotherapy with a reduced dosage for malnourished children and postoperative chemotherapy based on surgical staging. Pediatr Blood Cancer © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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