Article

Extended-release naltrexone plus medical management alcohol treatment in primary care: findings at 15 months

New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: .
Journal of substance abuse treatment (Impact Factor: 2.9). 09/2012; 43(4). DOI: 10.1016/j.jsat.2012.08.012
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The feasibility of long-term extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX) alcohol treatment is unknown. Following an initial 12-week, single-arm, observational trial of XR-NTX plus medical management (MM) in primary care, we offered 48 additional weeks of XR-NTX treatment (12 additional monthly injections) in two public primary care clinics as a naturalistic extension study. Of 65 alcohol dependent adults initiating XR-NTX treatment, 40 (62%) completed the initial 12-week XR-NTX observational trial, and 19 (29%) continued treatment for a median of 38weeks total (range, 16-72weeks; median 8 total XR-NTX injections). Among active extension phase participants, self-reported rates of drinking days (vs. last 30 days pre-treatment baseline) were low: median 0.2 vs. 6.0drinks per day; 82 vs. 38% days abstinent; 11 vs. 61% heavy drinking days. Long-term XR-NTX treatment in a primary care MM model was feasible and may promote lasting drinking reductions or alcohol abstinence (clinical trial: NCT00620750).

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