Article

Segmental chromosomal alterations have prognostic impact in neuroblastoma: a report from the INRG project

1] INSERM U830, Laboratoire de Génétique et Biologie des Cancers, Institut Curie, Paris, France [2] Département d'Oncologie Pédiatrique, Institut Curie, 26 rue d'Ulm, Cedex 05, Paris 75248, France.
British Journal of Cancer (Impact Factor: 5.08). 09/2012; 107(8):1418-22. DOI: 10.1038/bjc.2012.375
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Background:In the INRG dataset, the hypothesis that any segmental chromosomal alteration might be of prognostic impact in neuroblastoma without MYCN amplification (MNA) was tested.Methods:The presence of any segmental chromosomal alteration (chromosome 1p deletion, 11q deletion and/or chromosome 17q gain) defined a segmental genomic profile. Only tumours with a confirmed unaltered status for all three chromosome arms were considered as having no segmental chromosomal alterations.Results:Among the 8800 patients in the INRG database, a genomic type could be attributed for 505 patients without MNA: 397 cases had a segmental genomic type, whereas 108 cases had an absence of any segmental alteration. A segmental genomic type was more frequent in patients >18 months and in stage 4 disease (P<0.0001). In univariate analysis, 11q deletion, 17q gain and a segmental genomic type were associated with a poorer event-free survival (EFS) (P<0.0001, P=0.0002 and P<0.0001, respectively). In multivariate analysis modelling EFS, the parameters age, stage and a segmental genomic type were retained in the model, whereas the individual genetic markers were not (P<0.0001 and RR=2.56; P=0.0002 and RR=1.8; P=0.01 and RR=1.7, respectively).Conclusion:A segmental genomic profile, rather than the single genetic markers, adds prognostic information to the clinical markers age and stage in neuroblastoma patients without MNA, underlining the importance of pangenomic studies.

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