Article

Preventable childhood injuries.

*Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Vanderbilt Children's Hospital, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN †Department of Orthopaedics, University of Southern California, Children's Hospital Los Angeles §Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA ‡Fondren Orthopedic Group, L.L.P. ∥Winthrop Orthopaedic Associates, Garden City, NY.
Journal of pediatric orthopedics (Impact Factor: 1.43). 10/2012; 32(7):741-7. DOI: 10.1097/BPO.0b013e31824b753c
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT : This is a literature review generated from The Committee on Trauma and Prevention of Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America to bring to the forefront 4 main areas of preventable injuries in children.
: Literature review of pertinent published studies or available information of 4 areas of childhood injury: trampoline and moonbouncers, skateboards, all-terrain vehicles, and lawn mowers.
: Much literature exists on these injuries.
: Preventable injuries occur at alarming rates in children. By arming the orthopaedist with a concise account of these injuries, patient education and child safety may be promoted.
: 3.

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