Article

CheShift-2 resolves a local inconsistency between two X-ray crystal structures.

Baker Laboratory of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853-1301, USA.
Journal of Biomolecular NMR (Impact Factor: 3.31). 09/2012; 54(2):193-8. DOI: 10.1007/s10858-012-9663-0
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Since chemical shifts provide important and relatively accessible information about protein structure in solution, a Web server, CheShift-2, was developed for structure interrogation, based on a quantum mechanics database of (13)C( α ) chemical shifts. We report the application of CheShift-2 to a local inconsistency between two X-ray crystal structures (PDB IDs 1IKN and 1NFI) of the complex between the p65/p50 heterodimer of NFκB and its inhibitor IκBα. The availability of NMR resonance assignments that included the region of the inconsistency provided an opportunity for independent validation of the CheShift-2 server. Application of the server showed that the (13)C( α ) chemical shifts measured for the Gly270-Pro281 sequence close to the C-terminus of IκBα were unequivocally consistent with the backbone structure modeled in the 1IKN structure, and were inconsistent with the 1NFI structure. Previous NOE measurements had demonstrated that the position of a tryptophan ring in the region immediately N-terminal in this region was not consistent with either structure. Subsequent recalculation of the local structure in this region, based on the electron density of the deposited structure factors for 1IKN, confirmed that the local backbone structure was best modeled by 1IKN, but that the rotamer of Trp258 is consistent with the 1NFI structure, including the presence of a hydrogen bond between the ring NεH of Trp258 and the backbone carbonyl group of Gln278. The consensus between all of these measures suggests that the CheShift-2 server operates well under circumstances in which backbone chemical shifts are available but where local plasticity may render X-ray structural data ambiguous.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
91 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Biomolecular NMR structures are now routinely used in biology, chemistry, and bioinformatics. Methods and metrics for assessing the accuracy and precision of protein NMR structures are beginning to be standardized across the biological NMR community. These include both knowledge-based assessment metrics, parameterized from the database of protein structures, and model versus data assessment metrics. On line servers are available that provide comprehensive protein structure quality assessment reports, and efforts are in progress by the world-wide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB) to develop a biomolecular NMR structure quality assessment pipeline as part of the structure deposition process. These quality assessment metrics and standards will aid NMR spectroscopists in determining more accurate structures, and increase the value and utility of these structures for the broad scientific community.
    Current Opinion in Structural Biology 09/2013; · 8.75 Impact Factor