New vaccine introduction in the East and Southern African sub-region of the WHO African region in the context of GIVS and MDGs

World Health Organization, Expanded Programme on Immunisation, Immunisation and Vaccine Development, South Africa.
Vaccine (Impact Factor: 3.62). 09/2012; 30 Suppl 3:C3-8. DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2012.05.086
Source: PubMed


Immunization programmes have over the years proven to be effective and useful in infectious disease control. However, based on current trends that show that many developing countries will not reach the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) targets, there is an urgent need to accelerate efforts to control the most common conditions still responsible for the largest morbidity and mortality in children under 5 years of age, like diarrhoea and pneumonia, for which safe and effective vaccines are now available.

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