Article

Nematode-Trapping Fungi

Current Research in Environmental & Applied Mycology 06/2011; 1(1):1-26.

ABSTRACT This manuscript provides an account of nematode-trapping fungi including their taxonomy, phylogeny and evolution. There are four broad groups of nematophagous fungi categorized based on their mechanisms of attacking nematodes. These include 1) nematode-trapping fungi using adhesive or mechanical hyphal traps, 2) endoparasitic fungi using their spores, 3) egg parasitic fungi invading nematode eggs or females with their hyphal tips, and 4) toxin-producing fungi immobilizing nematodes before invasion The account briefly mentions fossil nematode-trapping fungi and looks at biodiversity, ecology and geographical distribution including factors affecting their distribution such as salinity. Nematode-trapping fungi occur in terrestrial, freshwater and marine habitats, but rarely occur in extreme environments. Fungal-nematodes interactions are discussed the potential role of nematode-trapping fungi in biological control is briefly reviewed. Although the potential for use of nematode-trapping fungi is high there have been few successes resulting in commercial products.

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Available from: Rajesh Jeewon, Apr 18, 2014
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