Article

Epigenetic obstacles encountered by transcription factors: reprogramming against all odds

Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA
Current opinion in genetics & development (Impact Factor: 8.57). 08/2012; 22(5). DOI: 10.1016/j.gde.2012.08.002
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Reprogramming of a somatic nucleus to an induced pluripotent state can be achieved in vitro through ectopic expression of Oct4 (Pou5f1), Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc. While the ability of these factors to regulate transcription in a pluripotent context has been studied extensively, their ability to interact with and remodel a somatic genome remains underexplored. Several recent studies have begun to provide mechanistic insights that will eventually lead to a more rational design and improved understanding of nuclear reprogramming.

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