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Available from: Saman Abeysekara, Aug 29, 2015
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    ABSTRACT: The aim was to evaluate dietary intakes and their correlation to some risk factors for coronary heart disease. The study was a population based survey with random sample selection stratified by age and sex. 352 adults living in a small town in Northern Italy took part in the study. Response rate was 46% among females and 48% among males. Refusal to take part was mainly due to the large number of tests involved. Diets were high in protein (animal/vegetable ratio 1.7 in women and 1.4 in men) and in fat and low in carbohydrates. The hypercholesterolaemic and atherogenic potential of the diet, evaluated by the cholesterol/saturated fat index, was high in about 50% of the population. The thiamin and riboflavin intakes were lower than the Italian recommended allowances in more than 60% of the people tested, whereas the vitamin A intake was more than adequate in about 70%. A positive association was found in the younger groups (men and women 20-39 years old) between some nutrient components (energy, alcohol, total and saturated fats) and some blood lipids. In the older people blood lipids were correlated with body mass index. The overall data indicate that a correlation exists between dietary intake and some risk factors for coronary heart disease; dietary intervention, at least in young adults, is suggested.
    Journal of Epidemiology &amp Community Health 07/1991; 45(2):148-51. DOI:10.1136/jech.45.2.148 · 3.29 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Oat or bean products, rich in water-soluble fiber, have distinct hypocholesterolemic effects in humans. After a control diet, 20 hypercholesterolemic men were randomly allocated to oat-bran or bean supplemented diets for 21 days on a metabolic ward. Control and test diets provided equivalent energy, fat, and cholesterol but test diets had twice more total and 3-fold more soluble fiber. Oat-bran diets decreased serum cholesterol concentrations by 19% (p less than 0.0005) and calculated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 23% (p less than 0.0025). Bean diets decreased serum cholesterol concentrations by 19% (p less than 0.0005) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol by 24% (p less than 0.0005). Oat-bran increased fecal weight by 43% but beans did not. While oat-bran increased fecal bile acid excretion, beans had the opposite effect. Oat-bran or bean supplements may have an important role in nutritional management of selected hypercholesterolemic patients.
    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition 01/1985; 40(6):1146-55. · 6.92 Impact Factor
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    ABSTRACT: Legume consumption appears to lower serum cholesterol and to increase cholesterol saturation of bile, but the mechanisms of these effects have not been established. We studied nine human subjects on a metabolic ward during two randomly ordered 6-7 week periods: one during consumption of a control diet and the other during consumption of the same diet with 120 gm mixed legumes substituted for foods having equivalent calories, fat, protein, and carbohydrate. Mean serum LDL cholesterol was significantly lower during legume consumption (126 vs. 138 mg/dl, P = 0.039). Legume consumption significantly increased mean cholesterol saturation index of gallbladder bile from 1.07 to 1.26 (P = 0.016), largely because of an increase in hepatic secretion of cholesterol from a mean of 90.2 mumol/h to 100.8 mumol/h (P = 0.042). Fecal neutral sterol output was unaffected by legumes, but fecal acidic sterols increased from a mean of 861 to 1202 mumol/day (P = 0.002) during legume consumption. Mean sterol balance became significantly more negative during legume consumption (-2140 vs. -2700 mumol/day, P = 0.037) indicating an increase in cholesterol synthesis. Mean fractional absorption of bile acid was lower during legume consumption than (0.947 vs. 0.960, P = 0.003). These data suggest that legume consumption lower LDL cholesterol by partially interrupting the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids and increases cholesterol saturation of bile by increasing hepatic secretion of cholesterol.
    The Journal of Lipid Research 07/1997; 38(6):1120-8. · 4.73 Impact Factor
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