Article

Secondary Muscle Pathology and Metabolic Dysregulation in Adults with Cerebral Palsy.

1University of Michigan.
AJP Endocrinology and Metabolism (Impact Factor: 4.09). 08/2012; 303(9). DOI: 10.1152/ajpendo.00338.2012
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Cerebral palsy (CP) is caused by an insult to, or malformation of the developing brain which affects motor control centers, and causes alterations in growth, development, and overall health throughout the lifespan. In addition to the disruption in development caused by the primary neurologic insult, CP is associated with exaggerated sedentary behaviors and a hallmark accelerated progression of muscle pathology compared to typically developing children and adults. Factors such as excess adipose tissue deposition and altered partitioning, insulin resistance, and chronic inflammation may increase the severity of muscle pathology throughout adulthood, and lead to cardiometabolic disease risk and/or early mortality. We describe a model of exaggerated health risk represented in adults with CP, and discuss the mechanisms and secondary consequences associated with chronic sedentary behavior, obesity, aging, and muscle spasticity. Moreover, we highlight novel evidence that implicates aberrant inflammation in CP as a potential mechanism linking both metabolic and cognitive dysregulation in a cyclical pattern.

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