Article

STRETCHing delivery of HIV health services

The Kirby Institute, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia.
The Lancet (Impact Factor: 39.21). 08/2012; 380(9845):865-7. DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(12)60952-0
Source: PubMed
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