Article

Flavonoid intake and bone health.

Department of Nutrition Science, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907-2059, USA.
Journal of nutrition in gerontology and geriatrics 07/2012; 31(3):239-53. DOI: 10.1080/21551197.2012.698220
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Flavonoids, found in a wide diversity of plant foods from fruits and vegetables, herbs and spices, essential oils, and beverages, have the most potential of dietary components for promotion of bone health beyond calcium and vitamin D. Recent epidemiological studies show flavonoid consumption to have a stronger association with bone than general fruit and vegetable consumption. Bioactive flavonoids are being assessed for properties beyond their chemical antioxidant capacity, including anti-inflammatory actions. Some have been reported to enhance bone formation and to inhibit bone resorption through their action on cell signaling pathways that influence osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation. Future research is needed to determine which of the flavonoids and their metabolites are most effective and at what dose, as well as the mechanism of modulating cellular events, in order to set priorities for clinical trials.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
165 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Potassium was identified as a shortfall nutrient by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010 Advisory Committee. The committee concluded that there was a moderate body of evidence of the association between potassium intake and blood pressure reduction in adults, which in turn influences the risk of stroke and coronary heart disease. Evidence is also accumulating of the protective effect of adequate dietary potassium on age-related bone loss and reduction of kidney stones. These benefits depend on organic anions associated with potassium as occurs in foods such as fruits and vegetables, in contrast to similar blood pressure-lowering benefits of potassium chloride. Benefits to blood pressure and bone health may occur at levels below current recommendations for potassium intake, especially from diet, but dose-response trials are needed to confirm this. Nevertheless, intakes considerably above current levels are needed for optimal health, and studies evaluating small increases in fruit and vegetable intake on bone and heart outcomes for short periods have had disappointing results. In modern societies, Western diets have led to a decrease in potassium intake with reduced consumption of fruits and vegetables with a concomitant increase in sodium consumption through increased consumption of processed foods. Consumption of white vegetables is associated with decreased risk of stroke, possibly related to their high potassium content. Potatoes are the highest source of dietary potassium, but the addition of salt should be limited. Low potassium-to-sodium intake ratios are more strongly related to cardiovascular disease risk than either nutrient alone. This relationship deserves further attention for multiple target tissue endpoints.
    Advances in Nutrition 01/2013; 4(3):368S-377S. · 3.20 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Osteoporosis and fragility fractures are a growing problem for our aging population with around 1 in 2 women and 1 in 5 men suffering from an osteoporotic fracture during their lifetime. Although there are established factors that can reduce the risk of fracture such as maintaining physical activity, ceasing smoking, and adequate vitamin D status, and intakes of calcium; dietary mechanisms are less well established. The relevance of the flavonoid group of bioactive compounds found in fruits and vegetables has been less investigated. Two human epidemiologic studies in women found positive associations between total dietary flavonoid intake and bone mineral density. Flavonoids may protect against bone loss by upregulating signaling pathways that promote osteoblast function, by reducing the effects of oxidative stress or chronic low-grade inflammation. The limitations of the existing research are explored in the manuscript and it is concluded that further research is needed, in this promising area.
    Current Osteoporosis Reports 03/2014;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Hesperetin (3',5,7-trihydroxy-4-methoxyflavanone) is a metabolite of hesperidin (hesperetin-7-O-rutinoside), which belongs to the flavanone subgroup and is found mainly in citrus fruits. Hesperetin has been reported to be an effective osteoinductive compound in various in vivo and in vitro models. However, how hesperetin effects osteogenic differentiation is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the capacity of hesperetin to stimulate the osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) and to relieve the anti-osteogenic effect of high glucose. Osteogenesis of PDLSCs was assessed by measurement of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and evaluation of the mRNA expression of ALP, runt-related gene 2 (Runx2), osterix (OSX), and FRA1 as osteogenic transcription factors, as well as assessment of protein expression of osteopontin (OPN) and collagen type IA (COLIA). When PDLSCs were exposed to a high concentration (30 mM) of glucose, osteogenic activity decreased compared to control cells. Hesperetin significantly increased ALP activity at doses of 1, 10, and 100 µM. Pretreatment of cells with hesperetin alleviated the high-glucose-induced suppression of the osteogenic activity of PDLSCs. Hesperetin scavenged intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced under high glucose condition. Furthermore, hesperetin increased the activity of the PI3K/Akt and β-catenin pathways. Consistent with this, blockage of Akt or β-catenin diminished the protective effect of hesperetin against high glucose-inhibited osteogenic differentiation. Collectively, our results suggest that hesperetin alleviates the high glucose-mediated suppression of osteogenic differentiation in PDLSCs by regulating ROS levels and the PI3K/Akt and β-catenin signaling pathways.
    PLoS ONE 01/2013; 8(6):e67504. · 3.73 Impact Factor