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Ketamine-Propofol vs Ketamine-Dexmedetomidine Combinations in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Burn Dressing Changes.

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Journal of burn care & research: official publication of the American Burn Association (Impact Factor: 1.54). 08/2012; DOI: 10.1097/BCR.0b013e3182504316
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to compare ketamine-propofol (KP) and ketamine-dexmedetomidine (KD) combinations for deep sedation and analgesia during pediatric burn wound dressing changes. After obtaining approval from the University Ethics Committee, burn wound care or wound dressing changes were performed on 60 ASA physical status I and II inpatients aged between 8 and 60 months with second-degree burns ranging from 5 to 25% TBSA. After recording the demographic data, the heart rate, systolic arterial pressure, diastolic arterial pressure, peripheral oxygen saturation, respiratory rate, and Ramsey sedation scores were recorded for all patients before and during the procedure. Group KP (n = 30) received 1 mg kg-1 ketamine + 1 mg kg propofol and group KD (n = 30) received 1 mg kg ketamine + 0.5 μg kg-1 dexmedetomidine for induction. Additional propofol (1 mg kg) for group KP and additional dexmedetomidine (0.5 μg kg) for group KD were administered when required. No statistically significant differences in sedation scores and peripheral oxygen saturation and diastolic arterial pressure (P > .05) were found between the two groups. However, systolic blood pressure values in group KD showed a significant increase after induction (P < .05). The recovery time was longer in group KD than in group KP (P > .05). The respiratory rate was higher in group KD than in group KP beginning from the fifth minute of the procedure. A significant amount of respiratory depression and hypoxia was observed in group KP but not in KD (P < .05). Both the KP and KD combinations were effective for sedation and analgesia during dressing changes in the pediatric burn patients. The KD combination can be considered as an excellent alternative for pediatric wound dressing changes which does not result in respiratory depression.

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