Article

Risk assessment of fragility fractures: summary of NICE guidance

National Clinical Guideline Centre, Royal College of Physicians, London NW1 4LE, UK.
BMJ (online) (Impact Factor: 16.38). 08/2012; 345:e3698. DOI: 10.1136/bmj.e3698
Source: PubMed
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