Article

The Veterans Affairs National Quality Scholars Program A Model for Interprofessional Education in Quality and Safety

Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, Case Western Reserve University (Drs Dolansky and Moore) and VA National Quality Scholars Program, Cleveland VA Medical Center (Dr Dolansky), Cleveland, Ohio
Journal of nursing care quality (Impact Factor: 1.09). 08/2012; 28(1). DOI: 10.1097/NCQ.0b013e3182678f41
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) project is enhancing the emphasis on quality care and patient safety content in nursing schools. A partnership between QSEN and the Veterans Affairs National Quality Scholars program resulted in a unique experiential, interdisciplinary fellowship for both nurses and physicians. This article introduces the Veterans Affairs National Quality Scholars program and provides examples of learning activities and fellows' accomplishments. Interprofessional quality and safety education at the doctoral and postdoctoral levels is germane to improving the quality of health care.

0 Followers
 · 
89 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Healthcare systems and their primary care practices are redesigning to achieve goals identified in Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) models such as Veterans Affairs (VA)'s Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACT). Implementation of these models, however, requires major transformation. Evidence-Based Quality Improvement (EBQI) is a multi-level approach for supporting organizational change and innovation spread. To describe EBQI as an approach for promoting VA's PACT and to assess initial implementation of planned EBQI elements. Descriptive. Regional and local interdisciplinary clinical leaders, patient representatives, Quality Council Coordinators, practicing primary care clinicians and staff, and researchers from six demonstration site practices in three local healthcare systems in one VA region. EBQI promotes bottom-up local innovation and spread within top-down organizational priorities. EBQI innovations are supported by a research-clinical partnership, use continuous quality improvement methods, and are developed in regional demonstration sites. We developed a logic model for EBQI for PACT (EBQI-PACT) with inputs, outputs, and expected outcomes. We describe implementation of logic model outputs over 18 months, using qualitative data from 84 key stakeholders (104 interviews from two waves) and review of study documents. Nearly all implementation elements of the EBQI-PACT logic model were fully or partially implemented. Elements not fully achieved included patient engagement in Quality Councils (4/6) and consistent local primary care practice interdisciplinary leadership (4/6). Fourteen of 15 regionally approved innovation projects have been completed, three have undergone initial spread, five are prepared to spread, and two have completed toolkits that have been pretested in two to three sites and are now ready for external spread. EBQI-PACT has been feasible to implement in three participating healthcare systems in one VA region. Further development of methods for engaging patients in care design and for promoting interdisciplinary leadership is needed.
    Journal of General Internal Medicine 04/2014; 29(S2). DOI:10.1007/s11606-013-2703-y
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose Learning about quality improvement (QI) in resident physician training is often relegated to elective or noncore clinical activities. The authors integrated teaching, learning, and doing QI into the routine clinical work of inpatient internal medicine teams at a Veterans Affairs (VA) hospital. This study describes the design factors that facilitated and inhibited the integration of a QI curriculum-including real QI work-into the routine work of inpatient internal medicine teams. Method A realist evaluation framework used three data sources: field notes from QI faculty; semistructured interviews with resident physicians; and a group interview with QI faculty and staff. From April 2011 to July 2012, resident physician teams at the White River Junction VA Medical Center used the Model for Improvement for their QI work and analyzed data using statistical process control charts. Results Three domains affected the delivery of the QI curriculum and engagement of residents in QI work: setting, learner, and teacher. The constant presence of the QI material on a public space in the team workroom was a facilitating mechanism in the setting. Explicit sign-out of QI work to the next resident team formalized the handoff in the learner domain. QI teachers who were respected clinical leaders with QI expertise provided role modeling and local system knowledge. Conclusions Integrating QI teaching into the routine clinical and educational systems of an inpatient service is challenging. Identifiable, concrete strategies in the setting, learner, and teacher domains helped integrate QI into the clinical and educational systems.
    Academic medicine: journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges 06/2014; 89(10). DOI:10.1097/ACM.0000000000000389