Article

Restless Pillow, Ruffled Mind: Sleep and Affect Coupling in Interepisode Bipolar Disorder

Journal of Abnormal Psychology (Impact Factor: 4.86). 07/2012; 121(4). DOI: 10.1037/a0028233
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Disturbances in sleep and affect are prominent features of bipolar disorder, even during interepisode periods. Few longitudinal studies have prospectively examined the relationship between naturally occurring sleep and affect, and no studies to date have done so during interepisode periods of bipolar disorder and using the entire set of "gold standard" sleep parameters. Participants diagnosed with bipolar I disorder who were interepisode (n = 32) and healthy controls (n = 36) completed diagnostic and symptom severity interviews, and a daily sleep and affect diary, as well as an actigraphy sleep assessment, for eight weeks (M = 54 days, ± 8 days). Mutual information analysis was used to assess the degree of statistical dependence, or coupling, between time series data of sleep and affect. As measured by actigraphy, longer sleep onset latency was coupled with higher negative affect more strongly in the bipolar group than in the control group. As measured by sleep diary, longer wakefulness after sleep onset and lower sleep efficiency were coupled with higher negative affect significantly more strongly in the bipolar group than in the control group. By contrast, there were no significant differences between groups in the degree of coupling between any measures of sleep and positive affect. Findings support the coupling of sleep disturbance and negative affect during interepisode bipolar disorder. Ongoing monitoring of sleep-affect coupling may provide an important target for intervention in bipolar disorder. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

0 Followers
 · 
223 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Disruptions in sleep and circadian rhythms are observed in individuals with bipolar disorders (BD), both during acute mood episodes and remission. Such abnormalities may relate to dysfunction of the molecular circadian clock and could offer a target for new drugs. Areas covered: This review focuses on clinical, actigraphic, biochemical and genetic biomarkers of BDs, as well as animal and cellular models, and highlights that sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances are closely linked to the susceptibility to BDs and vulnerability to mood relapses. As lithium is likely to act as a synchronizer and stabilizer of circadian rhythms, we will review pharmacogenetic studies testing circadian gene polymorphisms and prophylactic response to lithium. Interventions such as sleep deprivation, light therapy and psychological therapies may also target sleep and circadian disruptions in BDs efficiently for treatment and prevention of bipolar depression. Expert opinion: We suggest that future research should clarify the associations between sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances and alterations of the molecular clock in order to identify critical targets within the circadian pathway. The investigation of such targets using human cellular models or animal models combined with ‘omics’ approaches are crucial steps for new drug development.
    Expert Opinion on Therapeutic Targets 03/2015; 19(6):1-17. DOI:10.1517/14728222.2015.1018822 · 4.90 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background. Though poorly defined, hypersomnia is associated with negative health outcomes and new-onset and recurrence of psychiatric illness. Lack of definition impedes generalizability across studies. The present research clarifies hypersomnia diagnoses in bipolar disorder by exploring possible subgroups and their relationship to prospective sleep data and relapse into mood episodes. Method. A community sample of 159 adults (aged 18-70 years) with bipolar spectrum diagnoses, euthymic at study entry, was included. Self-report inventories and clinician-administered interviews determined features of hypersomnia. Participants completed sleep diaries and wore wrist actigraphs at home to obtain prospective sleep data. Approximately 7 months later, psychiatric status was reassessed. Factor analysis and latent profile analysis explored empirical groupings within hypersomnia diagnoses. Results. Factor analyses confirmed two separate subtypes of hypersomnia ('long sleep' and 'excessive sleepiness') that were uncorrelated. Latent profile analyses suggested a four-class solution, with 'long sleep' and 'excessive sleepiness' again representing two separate classes. Prospective sleep data suggested that the sleep of 'long sleepers' is characterized by a long time in bed, not long sleep duration. Longitudinal assessment suggested that 'excessive sleepiness' at baseline predicted mania/hypomania relapse. Conclusions. This study is the largest of hypersomnia to include objective sleep measurement, and refines our understanding of classification, characterization and associated morbidity. Hypersomnia appears to be comprised of two separate subgroups: long sleep and excessive sleepiness. Long sleep is characterized primarily by long bedrest duration. Excessive sleepiness is not associated with longer sleep or bedrest, but predicts relapse to mania/hypomania. Understanding these entities has important research and treatment implications.
    Psychological Medicine 12/2014; DOI:10.1017/S0033291714002918 · 5.43 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective To evaluate the relative role of psychopathology in the relationship between physical activity and sleep, the present study investigated the day-to-day relationship between physical activity and sleep in individuals without a psychiatric disorder and individuals with bipolar disorder using a longitudinal, naturalistic design. Method Participants in two groups—a healthy group with no psychiatric illness (N=36) and an inter-episode bipolar disorder group (N=32)— were studied over a two-month period. Physical health was assessed by the SF-36. Daily subjective and objective measures of physical activity and sleep were collected. A total of 6,670 physical activity measurements and 6,548 sleep measurements were logged. Results The bipolar disorder group exhibited poorer physical health on the SF-36 and more sleep disturbance relative to the healthy group. No group differences were found in physical activity, nor in models examining the relationship between physical activity and sleep. Hierarchical linear models indicated that for every standard deviation increase in sleep disturbance (i.e., increased total wake time), there was a three percent decrease in subsequent day physical activity, in both the healthy and bipolar groups. Increased physical activity was associated with improved sleep for participants who reported greater average sleep disturbance. Conclusions The results for all participants in the study suggest that reduced physical activity and sleep difficulties may be mutually maintaining processes, particularly for individuals who suffer from poor sleep. Findings also raise the potential importance of targeting physical activity and sleep concurrently in interventions aimed at improving physical and mental health.
    Mental Health and Physical Activity 06/2014; 7(3). DOI:10.1016/j.mhpa.2014.05.003