Article

Serum chemerin levels are associated with the presence and extent of coronary artery disease.

Department of Cardiology, Beijing Armed Police Corps Hospital, China.
Coronary artery disease (Impact Factor: 1.3). 07/2012; 23(6):412-6. DOI: 10.1097/MCA.0b013e3283576a60
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The aim of the study was to examine whether serum chemerin levels are associated with the presence and the extent of coronary artery disease (CAD).
A total of 132 patients with CAD and 56 patients without CAD who underwent coronary angiography for the evaluation of CAD were enrolled in this study. Serum levels of chemerin were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
Serum chemerin levels were significantly elevated in CAD patients compared with those without CAD. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that serum chemerin levels were significantly associated with the presence of CAD. In CAD patients, chemerin was positively correlated with BMI (r=0.274, P=0.001) and triglycerides (r=0.190, P=0.029), and yet correlated with low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (r=0.228, P=0.008); the association of chemerin with triglycerides and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol remained significant after adjusting for BMI (P<0.05 and P<0.01). At multiple stepwise regression analysis, serum chemerin levels were an independent predictor of the stenosis score (β=0.193, P=0.034).
Our data suggest that increased chemerin levels are associated with the presence of CAD and that serum chemerin levels may reflect the extent of coronary atherosclerosis.

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