Article

Attention deficit hyperactivity symptoms and Internet addiction

Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences (Impact Factor: 2.04). 10/2004; 58(5):487 - 494. DOI: 10.1111/j.1440-1819.2004.01290.x

ABSTRACT Abstract  The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between attention deficit-hyperactivity/impulsivity symptoms and Internet addiction. In total, 535 elementary school students (264 boys, 271 girls; mean age, 11.0 ± 1.0 years) were recruited. The presence or severity of Internet addiction was assessed by the Young's Internet Addiction test. Parents and teachers of the children completed the DuPaul's attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) rating scale (ARS; Korean version, K-ARS) and Child Behavior Checklists. Children with the highest and lowest quartiles in K-ARS scores were defined to be in ADHD and non-ADHD groups, respectively. Five children (0.9%) met criteria for a definite Internet addiction and 75 children (14.0%) met criteria for a probable Internet addiction. K-ARS scores had significant positive correlations with Young's Internet Addiction test scores. The Internet addiction group had higher total scores of K-ARS and ADHD-related subcategories in the Child Behavior Checklists than the non-addiction group. The ADHD group had higher Internet addiction scores compared with the non-ADHD group. Therefore, significant associations have been found between the level of ADHD symptoms and the severity of Internet addiction in children. In addition, current findings suggest that the presence of ADHD symptoms, both in inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity domains, may be one of the important risk factors for Internet addiction.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
88 Views
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Problematic Internet use (PIU), which has become a global social issue, can be broadly conceptualized as an inability to control one's use of the Internet which leads to negative consequences in daily life. The aim of this paper is to give a brief overview of the gradually evolving body of literature on PIU. This shows that the definitions and diagnostic criteria that have been proposed, and the assessment tools that have been developed, stress similarities between PIU, addictive behaviours and impulse-control disorders. Disagreements regarding diagnostic criteria and the lack of large epidemiological studies have resulted in difficulties in establishing the prevalence of PIU in the general population. Studies suggest high comorbidity rates between PIU and numerous psychiatric disorders highlighting the importance of focusing on comorbidity in treatment. There is growing evidence that genetic, personality and individual differences in automatic and controlled aspects of self-regulation may promote the development of PIU. Pharmacological and psychotherapeutic treatments specific to PIU have received limited testing in large, rigorous studies however preliminary evidence suggests that both psychotropic medications (Escitalopram, Naltrexone and Methylphenidate) and cognitive behaviour therapy may have some utility in the treatment of PIU. More research is needed on areas which remain unclear and contribute to the prognosis of PIU, in particular the temporal relationships between psychiatric disorder and PIU, mechanisms of comorbidity and the more subtle psychological changes that occur through Internet use.
    Addictive Behaviors 01/2014; 39(1):3-6. · 2.02 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study evaluates the association between Internal Addiction (IA) and psychiatric co-morbidity in the literature.
    BMC Psychiatry 06/2014; 14(1):183. · 2.23 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Many researchers have reported a relationship between Internet addiction and depression. In the present study, we compared the resting-state quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) activity of treatment-seeking patients with comorbid Internet addiction and depression with those of treatment-seeking patients with Internet addiction without depression, and healthy controls to investigate the neurobiological markers that differentiate pure Internet addiction from Internet addiction with comorbid depression. Thirty-five patients diagnosed with Internet addiction and 34 age-, sex-, and IQ-matched healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Patients with Internet addiction were divided into two groups according to the presence (N=18) or absence (N=17) of depression. Resting-state, eye-closed QEEG was recorded, and the absolute and relative power of the brain were analyzed. The Internet addiction group without depression had decreased absolute delta and beta powers in all brain regions, whereas the Internet addiction group with depression had increased relative theta and decreased relative alpha power in all regions. These neurophysiological changes were not related to clinical variables. The current findings reflect differential resting-state QEEG patterns between both groups of participants with Internet addiction and healthy controls and also suggest that decreased absolute delta and beta powers are neurobiological markers of Internet addiction.
    Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry 12/2013; · 3.55 Impact Factor