Article

Consciousness and the Brain

Department of Physiology and Neuroscience, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016, USA
Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (Impact Factor: 4.38). 01/2006; 929(1):166 - 175. DOI: 10.1111/j.1749-6632.2001.tb05715.x

ABSTRACT The goal of this paper is to explore the basic assumption that large-scale, temporal coincidence of specific and nonspecific thalamic activity generates the functional states that characterize human cognition.

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