Article

Geriatric oncology research to improve clinical care.

James Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Box 704, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.
Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology (Impact Factor: 15.7). 07/2012; 9(10):571-8. DOI: 10.1038/nrclinonc.2012.125
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Cancer incidence increases with advanced age. The Cancer and Aging Research Group, in partnership with the National Institute on Aging and NCI, have summarized the gaps in knowledge in geriatric oncology and made recommendations to close these gaps. One recommendation was that the comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) should be incorporated within geriatric oncology research. Information from the CGA can be used to stratify patients into risk categories to better predict their tolerance of cancer treatment, and to follow functional consequences from treatment. Other recommendations were to design trials for older adults with study end points that address the needs of the older and/or vulnerable adult with cancer and to build a better infrastructure to accommodate the needs of older adults to improve their representation in trials. We use a case-based approach to highlight gaps in knowledge regarding the care of older adults with cancer, discuss our current state of knowledge of best practice patterns, and identify opportunities for research in geriatric oncology. More evidence regarding the treatment of older patients with cancer is urgently needed.

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