Article

Assessing Intimacy: The Pair Inventory*

Journal of Marital and Family Therapy (Impact Factor: 1.01). 06/2007; 7(1):47 - 60. DOI: 10.1111/j.1752-0606.1981.tb01351.x

ABSTRACT PAIR, acronym for Personal Assessment of Intimacy in Relationships, was developed as a tool for educators, researchers and therapists. PAIR provides systematic information on five types of intimacy: emotional, social, sexual, intellectual and recreational. Individuals, married or unmarried, describe their relationship in terms of how they currently perceive it (perceived) and how they would like it to be (expected). PAIR can be used with couples in marital therapy and enrichment groups.

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