Article

Alcohol steatosis and cytotoxicity: The role of cytochrome P4502E1 and autophagy.

Department of Pharmacology & Systems Therapeutics, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029, USA.
Free Radical Biology and Medicine (Impact Factor: 5.27). 07/2012; 53(6):1346-57. DOI: 10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2012.07.005
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The goal of the current study was to evaluate whether CYP2E1 plays a role in binge-ethanol induced steatosis and if autophagy impacts CYP2E1-mediated hepatotoxicity, oxidative stress and fatty liver formation produced by ethanol. Wild type (WT), CYP2E1 knockin (KI) and CYP2E1 knockout (KO) mice were gavaged with 3g/kg body wt ethanol twice a day for four days. This treatment caused fatty liver, elevation of CYP2E1 and oxidative stress in WT and KI mice but not KO mice. Autophagy was impaired in ethanol-treated KI mice compared to KO mice as reflected by a decline in the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio and lower total LC-3 and Beclin-1 levels coupled to increases in P62, pAKT/AKT and mTOR. Inhibition of macroautophagy by administration of 3-methyladenine enhanced the binge ethanol hepatotoxicity, steatosis and oxidant stress in CYP2E1 KI, but not CYP2E1 KO mice. Stimulation of autophagy by rapamycin blunted the elevated steatosis produced by binge ethanol. Treatment of HepG2 E47 cells which express CYP2E1 with 100mM ethanol for 8 days increased fat accumulation and oxidant stress but decreased autophagy. Ethanol had no effect on these reactions in HepG2 C34 cells which do not express CYP2E1. Inhibition of autophagy elevated ethanol toxicity, lipid accumulation and oxidant stress in the E47, but not C34 cells. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, and CYP2E1 inhibitor chlormethiazole blunted these effects of ethanol. These results indicate that CYP2E1 plays an important role in binge ethanol-induced fatty liver. We propose that CYP2E1-derived reactive oxygen species inhibit autophagy, which subsequently causes accumulation of lipid droplets. Inhibition of autophagy promotes binge ethanol induced hepatotoxicity, steatosis and oxidant stress via CYP2E1.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
144 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In this review, we describe research findings on the effects of alcohol exposure on two major catabolic systems in liver cells: the ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy. These hydrolytic systems are not unique to liver cells; they exist in all eukaryotic tissues and cells. However, because the liver is the principal site of ethanol metabolism, it sustains the greatest damage from heavy drinking. Thus, the focus of this review is to specifically describe how ethanol oxidation modulates the activities of the UPS and autophagy and the mechanisms by which these changes contribute to the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver injury. Here, we describe the history and the importance of cellular hydrolytic systems, followed by a description of each catabolic pathway and the differential modulation of each by ethanol exposure. Overall, the evidence for an involvement of these catabolic systems in the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease is quite strong. It underscores their importance, not only as effective means of cellular recycling and eventual energy generation, but also as essential components of cellular defense.
    Redox Biology. 12/2014; 3.
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Alcoholic liver disease is a major health problem in the United States and worldwide. Chronic alcohol consumption can cause steatosis, inflammation, fibrosis, cirrhosis and even liver cancer. Significant progress has been made to understand key events and molecular players for the onset and progression of alcoholic liver disease from both experimental and clinical alcohol studies. No successful treatments are currently available for treating alcoholic liver disease; therefore, development of novel pathophysiological-targeted therapies is urgently needed. This review summarizes the recent progress on animal models used to study alcoholic liver disease and the detrimental factors that contribute to alcoholic liver disease pathogenesis including miRNAs, S-adenosylmethionine, Zinc deficiency, cytosolic lipin-1β, IRF3-mediated apoptosis, RIP3-mediated necrosis and hepcidin. In addition, we summarize emerging adaptive protective effects induced by alcohol to attenuate alcohol-induced liver pathogenesis including FoxO3, IL-22, autophagy and nuclear lipin-1α.
    World journal of gastroenterology : WJG. 09/2014; 20(36):12908-12933.
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Alcohol consumption is a predominant etiological factor in the pathogenesis of chronic liver diseases, resulting in fatty liver, alcoholic hepatitis, fibrosis/cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Although the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver disease (ALD) involves complex and still unclear biological processes, the oxidative metabolites of ethanol such as acetaldehyde and reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a pre-eminent role in the clinical and pathological spectrum of ALD. Ethanol oxidative metabolism influences intracellular signaling pathways and deranges the transcriptional control of several genes, leading to fat accumulation, fibrogenesis and activation of innate and adaptive immunity. Acetaldehyde is known to be toxic to the liver and alters lipid homeostasis, decreasing peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and increasing sterol regulatory element binding protein activity via an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent mechanism. AMPK activation by ROS modulates autophagy, which has an important role in removing lipid droplets. Acetaldehyde and aldehydes generated from lipid peroxidation induce collagen synthesis by their ability to form protein adducts that activate transforming-growth-factor-β-dependent and independent profibrogenic pathways in activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Furthermore, activation of innate and adaptive immunity in response to ethanol metabolism plays a key role in the development and progression of ALD. Acetaldehyde alters the intestinal barrier and promote lipopolysaccharide (LPS) translocation by disrupting tight and adherent junctions in human colonic mucosa. Acetaldehyde and LPS induce Kupffer cells to release ROS and proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines that contribute to neutrophils infiltration. In addition, alcohol consumption inhibits natural killer cells that are cytotoxic to HSCs and thus have an important antifibrotic function in the liver. Ethanol metabolism may also interfere with cell-mediated adaptive immunity by impairing proteasome function in macrophages and dendritic cells, and consequently alters allogenic antigen presentation. Finally, acetaldehyde and ROS have a role in alcohol-related carcinogenesis because they can form DNA adducts that are prone to mutagenesis, and they interfere with methylation, synthesis and repair of DNA, thereby increasing HCC susceptibility.
    World Journal of Gastroenterology 12/2014; · 2.43 Impact Factor