Article

A call to action for comprehensive HIV services for men who have sex with men.

Center for Public Health and Human Rights, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.
The Lancet (Impact Factor: 39.21). 07/2012; 380(9839):424-38. DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(12)61022-8
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Where surveillance has been done, it has shown that men (MSM) who have sex with men bear a disproportionate burden of HIV. Yet they continue to be excluded, sometimes systematically, from HIV services because of stigma, discrimination, and criminalisation. This situation must change if global control of the HIV epidemic is to be achieved. On both public health and human rights grounds, expansion of HIV prevention, treatment, and care to MSM is an urgent imperative. Effective combination prevention and treatment approaches are feasible, and culturally competent care can be developed, even in rights-challenged environments. Condom and lubricant access for MSM globally is highly cost effective. Antiretroviral-based prevention, and antiretroviral access for MSM globally, would also be cost effective, but would probably require substantial reductions in drug costs in high-income countries to be feasible. To address HIV in MSM will take continued research, political will, structural reform, community engagement, and strategic planning and programming, but it can and must be done.

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