Article

New insights into the mechanism of notch signalling in fibrosis.

Laboratoire d'immunologie, EA 1833, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris-Cité, Faculté de Médecine, Hôpital Cochin, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), France.
The Open Rheumatology Journal 01/2012; 6:96-102. DOI:10.2174/1874312901206010096
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT The Notch pathway is an evolutionary conserved signalling mechanism that regulates cellular fate and development in various types of cells. The full spectrum of Notch effects has been well studied over the last decade in the fields of development and embryogenesis. But only recently several studies emphasized the involvement of the Notch signalling pathway in fibrosis. This review summarizes the structure and activation of the Notch family members, and focuses on recent findings regarding the role of Notch in organ fibrogenesis, in humans and in animal models.

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    ABSTRACT: Notch signaling defines an evolutionarily ancient cell interaction mechanism, which plays a fundamental role in metazoan development. Signals exchanged between neighboring cells through the Notch receptor can amplify and consolidate molecular differences, which eventually dictate cell fates. Thus, Notch signals control how cells respond to intrinsic or extrinsic developmental cues that are necessary to unfold specific developmental programs. Notch activity affects the implementation of differentiation, proliferation, and apoptotic programs, providing a general developmental tool to influence organ formation and morphogenesis.
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    ABSTRACT: A small number of signalling pathways are used iteratively to regulate cell fates, cell proliferation and cell death in development. Notch is the receptor in one such pathway, and is unusual in that most of its ligands are also transmembrane proteins; therefore signalling is restricted to neighbouring cells. Although the intracellular transduction of the Notch signal is remarkably simple, with no secondary messengers, this pathway functions in an enormous diversity of developmental processes and its dysfunction is implicated in many cancers.
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Jan 17, 2013