Article

Low Handgrip Strength is Associated with Low Bone Mineral Density and Fragility Fractures in Postmenopausal Healthy Korean Women

Department of Internal Medicine, Kangwon National University School of Medicine, Chuncheon, Korea.
Journal of Korean medical science (Impact Factor: 1.25). 07/2012; 27(7):744-7. DOI: 10.3346/jkms.2012.27.7.744
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Osteoporosis is a widely recognized health problem in postmenopausal women. Osteoporotic fractures reduce independency, limit daily living activities, and increase the mortality rate. Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that low handgrip strength is a risk factor for functional limitations and disabilities, and all-cause mortality. We investigated the relationship between handgrip strength and bone mineral density (BMD) of the spine, femur neck, and total hip, as well the relationship between handgrip strength and previous fragility fractures in 337 healthy postmenopausal Korean women (mean age of 59.5 ± 6.8 yr) who were free of diseases or medications affecting bone metabolism. Age and handgrip strength were associated with BMD of the spine, femur neck, and total hip in multiple regression models. Low handgrip strength (odds ratio [OR], 0.925; range, 0.877 to 0.975; P = 0.004) and low femur neck BMD (OR, 0.019; range, 0.001 to 0.354; P = 0.008) were independent predictors of previous fragility fractures in a multiple regression model. Our results demonstrate that low handgrip strength is associated with low BMD of the spine, femur neck, and total hip, and with increased risk of previous fragility fractures.

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