Case 21-2012: A 27-Year-Old Man with Fatigue, Weakness, Weight Loss, and Decreased Libido

Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, USA.
New England Journal of Medicine (Impact Factor: 55.87). 07/2012; 367(2):157-69. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMcpc1110053
Source: PubMed
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