Article

Ankyrin-B protein in heart failure: identification of a new component of metazoan cardioprotection.

Dorothy M. Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.
Journal of Biological Chemistry (Impact Factor: 4.6). 07/2012; 287(36):30268-81. DOI: 10.1074/jbc.M112.368415
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Ankyrins (ankyrin-R, -B, and -G) are adapter proteins linked with defects in metazoan physiology. Ankyrin-B (encoded by ANK2) loss-of-function mutations are directly associated with human cardiovascular phenotypes including sinus node disease, atrial fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, and sudden cardiac death. Despite the link between ankyrin-B dysfunction and monogenic disease, there are no data linking ankyrin-B regulation with common forms of human heart failure. Here, we report that ankyrin-B levels are altered in both ischemic and non-ischemic human heart failure. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that cardiac ankyrin-B levels are tightly regulated downstream of reactive oxygen species, intracellular calcium, and the calcium-dependent protease calpain, all hallmarks of human myocardial injury and heart failure. Surprisingly, β(II)-spectrin, previously thought to mediate ankyrin-dependent modulation in the nervous system and heart, is not coordinately regulated with ankyrin-B or its downstream partners. Finally, our data implicate ankyrin-B expression as required for vertebrate myocardial protection as hearts deficient in ankyrin-B show increased cardiac damage and impaired function relative to wild-type mouse hearts following ischemia reperfusion. In summary, our findings provide the data of ankyrin-B regulation in human heart failure, provide insight into candidate pathways for ankyrin-B regulation in acquired human cardiovascular disease, and surprisingly, implicate ankyrin-B as a molecular component for cardioprotection following ischemia.

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