Article

Studies on biogas production from fruits and vegetable waste

Bayero Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences 01/2009; 2:115-118. DOI: 10.4314/bajopas.v2i1.58513

ABSTRACT Organic compounds decompose under anaerobic condition to yield biogas. This work presents results of the study on biogas production from fruits and vegetables waste materials and their effect on plants when used as fertilizer (Using digested and undigested sludge). It has been observed that the highest weekly individual production rate is recorded for the cow dung (control) slurry with average production of 1554 cm 3 , followed by pineapple waste which had 965 cm 3 of biogas, then by orange waste which had 612cm 3 of biogas, lastly, pumpkin and spinach wastes had 373 cm 3 and 269 cm 3 respectively. The results obtained shows that difference in the production of biogas to a large extent depends on the nature of the substrate. All the substrates used appeared to be good materials for biogas production and their spent slurries can be used as a source of plant nutrients.

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    ABSTRACT: authors are solely responsible for the content of this technical presentation. The technical presentation does not necessarily reflect the official position of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE), and its printing and distribution does not constitute an endorsement of views which may be expressed. Technical presentations are not subject to the formal peer review process by ASABE editorial committees; therefore, they are not to be presented as refereed publications. Citation of this work should state that it is from an ASABE meeting paper. EXAMPLE: Author Abstract. Anaerobic co-digestion of swine manure and corn stover for biogas production has been studied in two completely-mixed and semi-continuously fed reactors (Reactor 1 and Reactor 2). Each reactor had a working volume of 14 liters and was operated at 35°C, a hydraulic retention time of 25 days, and an agitation speed of 120 rpm. Initially the reactors were operated as duplicates and each was fed with 560 ml of swine wastewater per day. After a stable performance had been achieved in both reactors with almost the same results, corn stover was added to Reactor 2 to get a Carbon to Nitrogen ratio (C:N) of 10:1. Since then 560 ml of swine wastewater and 14 g of corn stover have been added to Reactor 2 every day to keep the C:N ratio at 10:1. In the meantime Reactor 1 has been fed the same as previously. Removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), fixed suspended solids (FSS), and volatile suspended solids (VSS) was 52%, 1%, 54%, and 55%, respectively in Reactor 1. When corn stover was added to Reactor 2, removal of COD, TKN, FSS, and VSS was 53%, 11%, 58%, and 59%, respectively. There was also a reduction of NH 4 -N by 15% in Reactor 2, probably because of the better balance of nutrients compared to Reactor 1, where an increase of ammonium was detected. Average gas production was 274 ml per day in Reactor 1 and 3,910 ml per day in Reactor 2. Gas chromatography (GC) analyses have shown that methane content is 67.8% in Reactor 1 and 50.7% in Reactor 2. Methane yield in Reactor 1 and Reactor 2 was 0.22 and 0.18 m3 of CH 4 per kg of COD removed, respectively. Preliminary results indicate that corn stover could be substantially degraded to methane in an anaerobic co-digestion with swine manure.
    2012 ASABE Annual International Meeting Sponsored by ASABE Hilton Anatole Dallas, Texas; 08/2012
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: authors are solely responsible for the content of this technical presentation. The technical presentation does not necessarily reflect the official position of the American Society of Agricultural and Biological Engineers (ASABE), and its printing and distribution does not constitute an endorsement of views which may be expressed. Technical presentations are not subject to the formal peer review process by ASABE editorial committees; therefore, they are not to be presented as refereed publications. Citation of this work should state that it is from an ASABE meeting paper. EXAMPLE: Author Abstract. Anaerobic co-digestion of swine manure and corn stover for biogas production has been studied in two completely-mixed and semi-continuously fed reactors (Reactor 1 and Reactor 2). Each reactor had a working volume of 14 liters and was operated at 35°C, a hydraulic retention time of 25 days, and an agitation speed of 120 rpm. Initially the reactors were operated as duplicates and each was fed with 560 ml of swine wastewater per day. After a stable performance had been achieved in both reactors with almost the same results, corn stover was added to Reactor 2 to get a Carbon to Nitrogen ratio (C:N) of 10:1. Since then 560 ml of swine wastewater and 14 g of corn stover have been added to Reactor 2 every day to keep the C:N ratio at 10:1. In the meantime Reactor 1 has been fed the same as previously. Removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), total kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), fixed suspended solids (FSS), and volatile suspended solids (VSS) was 52%, 1%, 54%, and 55%, respectively in Reactor 1. When corn stover was added to Reactor 2, removal of COD, TKN, FSS, and VSS was 53%, 11%, 58%, and 59%, respectively. There was also a reduction of NH 4 -N by 15% in Reactor 2, probably because of the better balance of nutrients compared to Reactor 1, where an increase of ammonium was detected. Average gas production was 274 ml per day in Reactor 1 and 3,910 ml per day in Reactor 2. Gas chromatography (GC) analyses have shown that methane content is 67.8% in Reactor 1 and 50.7% in Reactor 2. Methane yield in Reactor 1 and Reactor 2 was 0.22 and 0.18 m3 of CH 4 per kg of COD removed, respectively. Preliminary results indicate that corn stover could be substantially degraded to methane in an anaerobic co-digestion with swine manure.
    2012 ASABE Annual International Meeting Sponsored by ASABE Hilton Anatole Dallas, Texas July 29 – August 1, 2012, Dallas, Texas; 07/2012
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