• Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The primary purpose of the child protective services system is to protect children from the recurrence of child maltreatment. Understanding more about what predicts recurrence may help us more adequately target interventions to reduce the risk of future maltreatment. The specific objective of this study was to identify correlates of recurrence during CPS intervention for families who were provided continuing intervention following a confirmed index report of physical abuse or neglect. This nonconcurrent prospective study selected 446 subject families who met study eligibility requirements from 1,181 families randomly selected from the 2,902 families who had experienced a substantiated report of child abuse or neglect during the sampling year. Data were collected and coded from archival sources for 5 years following the index report. Each record was coded by two research analysts to increase inter-rater reliability. Data were analyzed with survival analysis methods: (1) Kaplan Meier and (2) the Cox Proportional Regression Model. Predictors of recurrence were child vulnerability, family stress, partner abuse, social support deficits, and an interaction between family stress and social support deficits. Implications of this and earlier research suggest that increasing social supports may help families cope with life events that increase stress and the risk of continued child maltreatment; that collaborations between CPS and domestic violence agencies are needed; and that screening maltreated children for mental health problems and other disabilities and assuring that children with these needs and their families get effective treatment may reduce the likelihood of continued maltreatment.
    Child Abuse & Neglect 09/1999; 23(8):729-43. · 2.47 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Social Judgement Theory (SJT) evolved from Egon Brunswik's Probabilistic Functionalist psychology coupled with multiple correlation and regression-based statistical analysis. Through its representational device, the Lens Model, SJT has become a widely used, systems-oriented perspective for analysing human judgement in specific ecological circumstances. Judgements are assumed to result from the integration of different cues or sources of perceptual information from the environment. Special advantages accrue to the SJT approach when criterion values (or correct values) for judgement are also available, as this permits the comparison of judgement processes to environmental processes and leads naturally to the generation of cognitive feedback as an aid to facilitate learning. In contrast to more prescriptive approaches to decision analysis, the SJT approach analyses judgements by decomposing the judgement process after judgements have been rendered. This a posteriori decomposition is accomplished by first using multiple regression analysis to recover prediction equations for both the judgement and ecological systems and then using the Lens Model Equation to compare those systems. SJT methods maintain close contact with ecological circumstances by employing the principle of representative design (which focuses on how the researcher obtains the stimuli for judgement) and avoiding unwarranted over-generalisations from nomothetic aggregation (e.g. averaging across judges) through the use of idiographic statistical analysis. SJT methods have proven valuable in the analysis of individual judgements as well as groupbased judgements where conflict becomes likely.
    Thinking and Reasoning 01/1996; 2:141-174. · 1.12 Impact Factor
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Typescript. Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Maryland, 1995. Vita. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 365-386).
    01/1999;

Full-text (2 Sources)

View
38 Downloads
Available from
Jun 1, 2014