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    ABSTRACT: Three sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.) cultivars namely Mr. Buster, Honey Graze and Extra Sweet of Australian origin were tested for their salinity tolerance. Their seedling growth was tested in a sand culture experiment n pots under saline irrigation with 0, 50, 100, and 150 mM NaCl prepared in half strength Hoagland solution. The parameters like number of leaves per plant and total leaf area per plant declined with salinity. Salt tolerance sequence, on the basis of 50 % loss of leaf area per plant over control, of the cultivars in hand was as - Cv. Buster > Cv Extra Sweet > Cv Honey Graze. Fifty per cent reduction in growth, in terms of dry weight of seedling phytomass, corresponded with 82.895, 82.089, and 72.65 mM NaCl in cultivars Extra Sweet, Honey Graze and Mr. Buster, respectively. Salt tolerance sequence, on the basis of 50 % losses of seedling phytomass over control, of the cultivars in hand was as - Cv. Honey Graze ≈ Cv Extra Sweet > Cv. Mr. Buster The relative turgidity of the plants remained unchanged under salinity treatments. Overall photosynthetic pigments were reduced significantly although chlorophyll – a remained statistically unchanged in concentration. Carotenoids level was reduced under salinity. The total soluble sugar contents in treated plants appeared not to vary with salinity. Protein contents declined. Although proline contents increased by 23.5% in Cv Mr. Buster under high salinity; in other varieties proline declined with salinity. There was an increase of phenolic contents up to 34.66 % in Honey Graze and 11.92% in Mr. Buster at NaCl concentration of 150 mM. The phenols, however, declined in Extra Sweet (6.14% in 50 mM NaCl and 19.67% in 100 mM NaCl. The electrolyte leakage from leaves of three varieties didn’t vary significantly among the varieties and under the salinity. Sodium, Potassium and chloride ions increased greatly with NaCl concentration. The results are discussed in eco-physiological context.
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    ABSTRACT: Three sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.] cultivars namely Mr. Buster, Honey Graze and Extra Sweet of Australian origin were tested for their salinity tolerance. Their germination was assayed against a series of NaCl concentrations (0, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 mM NaCl) in Petri plates. Seedling growth was tested in a sand culture experiment in pots under saline irrigation with 50, 100, and 150 mM NaCl prepared in half strength Hoagland solution. Germination of all cultivars was inhibited as a direct function of salinity. Salinity reduced the germination velocity relatively in higher magnitude in case of CV. Honey Graze. Fifty per cent reduction in final germination corresponded with 421.57, 335.57 and 327.46 mM NaCl in CV Mr. Buster, CV Extra Sweet and CV Honey Graze., respectively. The parameters like seedling phytomass, number of leaves per plant and total leaf area per plant declined with salinity. Fifty per cent reduction in growth, in terms of dry weight of seedling phytomass, corresponded with 82.9, 82.1, and 72.7 mM NaCl in CV Extra Sweet, CV Honey Graze and CV Mr. Buster, respectively. Obviously, sorghum appeared to be more tolerant at germination phase. Growth phase is more susceptible to the salinity in the root zone. Salt tolerance sequence, on the basis of 50 % germination loss over control, of the cultivars in hand was – Cv. Mr. Buster > CV Extra Sweet > CV. Honey Graze. Salt tolerance sequence, on the basis of 50 % loss of seedling phytomass over control, of the cultivars in hand was- Cv. Honey Graze ≈ CV Extra Sweet > CV. Mr. Buster
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    ABSTRACT: ABSTARCT The increased demand for sorghum (one of the important food/fodder/feed crops in the semi-arid tropics) driven by enhanced demand for milk and milk products imposes extension of sorghum cultivation in saline soils, which severely limits crop productivity. The development and adoption of cultivars tolerant to salinity is the cost-effective approach to enhance sorghum productivity in saline soils. However, attempts to breed sorghum for salinity tolerance are limited owing to the complexity in screening for and inheritance of salinity tolerance. In this article we have reviewed and discussed the screening methods and selection criteria used to breed sorghum for salinity tolerance.

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