Article

Insights into type 1 diabetes provided by genetic analyses.

Centre for Diabetes Research, The Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.
Current opinion in endocrinology, diabetes, and obesity (Impact Factor: 3.77). 06/2012; 19(4):263-70. DOI: 10.1097/MED.0b013e328355b7fe
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Recent identification of over 60 loci contributing to the susceptibility of developing type 1 diabetes (T1D) provides a timely opportunity to assess what is currently known of the genetics of T1D, and what these discoveries may tell us about the disease itself.
The major findings will be discussed under five main themes: T1D risk gene identification, molecular mechanisms of susceptibility, shared genetic cause with other diseases, development of novel analytical methods, and understanding disease heterogeneity.
The plethora of T1D risk genes that have been identified risk overwhelming clinicians with lists of gene names and symbols that have little bearing on management, and provide a challenge for researchers to place the genetics of T1D in a more amenable clinical context.

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