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ABUSE OF POWER: ANDREW JACKSON AND THE INDIAN REMOVAL ACT OF 1830

Alfred A. Cave is a professor of history at the University of Toledo.
Historian 12/2003; 65(6):1330 - 1353. DOI: 10.1111/j.0018-2370.2003.00055.x
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    Journal of Scientific Psychology. 12/2011;
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    ABSTRACT: This study seeks to explain the origins of two types of violence occurring on the Palestinian landscape, the erasure of Palestinian farms and the demolition of Palestinian homes. Such violence has two sources. One source derives from an enduring practice of meaningmaking about geographical places that has inspired groups with territorial ambitions to seize control of the landscapes they covet and is referred to by Edward Said as the crafting of ‘‘imaginative geographies.’’ The second source focuses on changes in property rights that follow when groups with territorial ambitions succeed in seizing control of coveted land. It is the imagined geography of Palestine as a homeland for the Jewish people, first framed by Zionists of the late 19th century and absorbed into the practices of Israeli state-building, and the changes in property rights inscribed into the Palestinian landscape following Zionist and Israeli military conquests in 1948 and 1967, that lie at the core of violence directed against the Palestinian farm and home today. This process of imagination, legal transformation, and violence is part of a longstanding lineage of dispossession that includes the English enclosures and the taking of land from Amerindians on the Anglo-American colonial frontier.
    Journal of Cultural Geography 10/2012; 29(3).

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