Article

Chemical Process for Making Dialdehyde Starch

Cereal Products Laboratory, Northern Regional Research Laboratory, Peoria, Illinois, 61604 (USA)
Starch - Starke (Impact Factor: 1.22). 12/1970; 23(2):42 - 45. DOI: 10.1002/star.19710230203
Source: OAI

ABSTRACT A practical, strictly chemical process has been developed for the periodic acid oxidation of starch to dialdehyde starch. In the procedure spent oxidant is converted by alkaline hypochlorite to insoluble sodium paraperiodate, which is recovered in high yield for recycling. The process is suitable for small-scale production of dialdehyde starches of various carbonyl contents.

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