Article

Polydextrose: its impact on short-term food intake and subjective feelings of satiety in males-a randomized controlled cross-over study.

Functional Food Centre, Oxford Brookes University, Gipsy Lane, Headington, Oxford, OX3 0BP, UK, .
European Journal of Nutrition (Impact Factor: 3.84). 06/2012; DOI: 10.1007/s00394-012-0395-4
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT PURPOSE: Polydextrose is a low-calorie highly branched-chain glucose polymer that is poorly digested in the upper gastrointestinal tract and therefore demonstrates fibre-like properties. Fibre has been shown to increase satiety and possibly reduce food intake. Therefore, the objective of the current study was to examine the effects of polydextrose on short-term satiety and energy intake. METHODS: In a repeated-measures randomized blind cross-over design, 26 healthy males consumed a 400-g fruit smoothie containing 12 g (3 %) of polydextrose, and a buffet lunch 60 min after the smoothie. Motivational ratings for satiety and palatability and lunch energy intake were measured. The effects of the polydextrose-containing smoothie were compared against a polydextrose-free control smoothie. RESULTS: Polydextrose did not significantly alter the taste and palatability of the fruit smoothie. Consuming the polydextrose-containing smoothie resulted in a significantly lower energy intake at lunch (102 kcal less) compared to the control. CONCLUSION: Polydextrose may be a good fortificant for reducing short-term food intake.

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