Article

Visceral leishmaniasis mimicking autoimmune hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, and systemic lupus erythematosus overlap.

Department of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Gazi University Hospital Besevler, 06500 Ankara, Turkey.
The Korean Journal of Parasitology (Impact Factor: 0.88). 06/2012; 50(2):133-6. DOI: 10.3347/kjp.2012.50.2.133
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a life-threatening infection caused by Leishmania species. In addition to typical clinical findings as fever, hepatosplenomegaly, and cachexia, VL is associated with autoimmune phenomena. To date, VL mimicking or exacerbating various autoimmune diseases have been described, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). Herein, we presented a patient with VL who had overlapping clinical features with SLE, AIH, as well as antimitochondrial antibody (AMA-M2) positive primary biliary cirrhosis.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
181 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Visceral leishmaniasis or kala-azar is an endemic parasitic disease in some parts of the world which is characterized by fever, splenomegaly, and pancytopenia in most of the cases. Herein we report an 11 month-old male infant with diagnosis of kala-azar who presented with pallor, hepatosplenomegaly, failure to gain weight, and no history of fever. Surprisingly, fever started after beginning of meglumine antimoniate treatment in this patient. As far as we are aware of, this is a rare presentation of visceral leishmaniasis. Therefore, clinicians especially in endemic areas are highly recommended to include kala-azar among differential diagnosis of unexplained anemia without fever to prevent misdiagnosis of this potentially fatal, but treatable condition.
    The Korean Journal of Parasitology 04/2014; 52(2):189-91. · 0.88 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Infectious agents are considered to be crucial environmental factor in the etiopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Infections may serve as initial trigger to the development of autoimmunity and carry an overall greater risk of morbidity and mortality than the general population. Initial presentation of SLE can mimic infections, and in turn infections can mimic disease flares in established SLE. Infections due to predisposition by commonly used immunosuppressive therapies are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. In this review, viral, bacterial, fungal, and parasitic infections that contribute to the etiology of SLE, potentially mimic or precipitate flares, create diagnostic dilemmas, complicate treatment, or protect against disease, are discussed. Infection risks of current immunosuppressive therapies used in the treatment of SLE are outlined. Strategies to prevent infection, including vaccines, prophylactic antibiotic therapies, toll-like receptor antagonism, and antioxidant treatment that may decrease disease burden and improve quality of life in lupus patients will be discussed.
    International Reviews Of Immunology 01/2014; · 5.73 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by multisystem organ involvement, heterogeneity of clinical features, and variety in degree of severity. The differential diagnosis is a crucial aspect in SLE as many other autoimmune diseases portray clinical similarities and autoantibody positivity. Lupus mimickers refer to a group of conditions that exhibit both clinical features and laboratory characteristics, including autoantibody profiles that resemble those present in patients with SLE, and prompt a diagnostic challenge in every-day clinical practice. Thus, lupus mimickers may present as a lupus-like condition (i.e., 2 or 3 criteria) or as one meeting the classification criteria for SLE. Herein we review and classify the current literature on lupus mimickers based on diverse etiologies which include infections, malign and benign neoplasms, medications, and vaccine-related reactions.
    Autoimmunity reviews 05/2014; · 6.37 Impact Factor

Full-text

View
1 Download
Available from

Similar Publications