Article

Four-dimensional investigation of the 2nd order volume autocorrelation technique

University of Crete Department of Physics P.O. Box 2208 71003 Heraklion, Crete Greece
Applied Physics B (Impact Factor: 1.78). 01/2009; 97(2):505-510. DOI: 10.1007/s00340-009-3559-z

ABSTRACT The 2nd order volume autocorrelation technique, widely utilized in directly measuring ultra-short light pulses durations,
is examined in detail via model calculations that include three-dimensional integration over a large ionization volume, temporal
delay and spatial displacement of the two beams of the autocorrelator at the focus. The effects of the inherent displacement
to the 2nd order autocorrelation technique are demonstrated for short and long pulses, elucidating the appropriate implementation
of the technique in tight focusing conditions. Based on the above investigations, ahigh accuracy 2nd order volume autocorrelation
measurement of the duration of the 5th harmonic of a 50fs long laser pulse, including the measurement of the carrier wavelength
oscillation, is presented.

0 Bookmarks
 · 
56 Views
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The two basic approaches underlying the metrology of attosecond pulse trains are compared, i.e. the 2nd order Intensity Volume Autocorrelation and the Resolution of Attosecond Beating by Interference of Two photon Transitions (RABITT). They give rather dissimilar results with respect to the measured pulse durations. It is concluded that RABITT may underestimate the duration due to variations of the driving intensity, but in conjunction with theory, allows an estimation of the relative contributions of two different electron trajectories to the extreme-ultraviolet emission. Comment: 12 Pages, 4 Figures, Corresponding author email address: ptzallas@iesl.forth.gr
    05/2010;
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The emission of above-ionization-threshold harmonics results from the recombination of two electron wavepackets moving along a "short" and a "long" trajectory in the atomic continuum. Attosecond pulse train generation has so far been attributed to the short trajectory, attempted to be isolated through targeted trajectory-selective phase matching conditions. Here, we provide experimental evidence for the contribution of both trajectories to the harmonic emission, even under phase matching conditions unfavorable for the long trajectory. This is finger printed in the interference modulation of the harmonic yield as a function of the driving laser intensity. The effect is also observable in the sidebands yield resulting from the frequency mixing of the harmonics and the driving laser field, an effect with consequences in cross-correlation pulse metrology approaches. Comment: 13 pages, 3 figures
    Physical Review A 07/2010; · 3.04 Impact Factor
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The two basic approaches underlying most of the metrology of attosecond pulse trains are compared in the spectral region {approx}14-24 eV, that is, the second-order intensity volume autocorrelation and the resolution of attosecond beating by interference of two photon transitions (RABITT). They give rather dissimilar pulse durations. It is concluded that for the present experimental conditions RABITT may underestimate the duration under measurement, due to variations of the driving intensity, but in conjunction with theory allows an estimation of the relative contributions of two different electron trajectories to the extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation.
    Physical Review A 08/2010; · 3.04 Impact Factor

Full-text (2 Sources)

View
19 Downloads
Available from
Jun 2, 2014