Article

Physicochemical and mechanical properties of UHMWPE 45 years’ experience

Interactive Surgery 11/2007; 2(3):169-173. DOI: 10.1007/s11610-007-0052-4

ABSTRACT The present paper provides a review of the properties of UHMWPE for total joint replacement and of some key features of its The present paper provides a review of the properties of UHMWPE for total joint replacement and of some key features of its
technology. The first paragraphs describe the basic physical and chemical properties of UHMWPE, as well as the main processing technology. The first paragraphs describe the basic physical and chemical properties of UHMWPE, as well as the main processing
and sterilisation methods. The following paragraphs are devoted to the chemical processes that lead to oxidative degradation and sterilisation methods. The following paragraphs are devoted to the chemical processes that lead to oxidative degradation
of the polymer, to its practical outcomes and to the contemporary strategies of packaging which aim to minimize this drawback. of the polymer, to its practical outcomes and to the contemporary strategies of packaging which aim to minimize this drawback.
Finally, the causes and the effects of wear and debris production are examined and, in the last sections, recent advances Finally, the causes and the effects of wear and debris production are examined and, in the last sections, recent advances
and future developments in crosslinking and stabilization are briefly described. and future developments in crosslinking and stabilization are briefly described.

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